levator


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Related to levator: Levator ani, Levator labii superioris, Levator veli palatini, Levator syndrome, Levator palpebrae, Levator palpebræ

levator

 [lĕ-va´ter] (L.)
1. a muscle that elevates an organ or structure.
2. an instrument for raising depressed osseous fragments in fractures.

le·va·tor

(le-vā'tŏr, tōr), [TA]
1. A surgical instrument for prying up the depressed part in a fracture of the skull.
2. One of several muscles with an action to raise the part to which it inserts.
[L. a lifter, fr. levo, pp. -atus, to lift, fr. levis, light]

levator

/le·va·tor/ (le-va´tor) pl. levato´res  
1. a muscle that elevates an organ or structure.
2. an instrument for raising depressed osseous fragments in fractures.

levator

(lə-vā′tər)
n. pl. levatores (lĕv′ə-tôr′ēz)
1. Anatomy A muscle that raises a bodily part.
2. A surgical instrument for lifting the depressed fragments of a fractured skull.

levator

[livā′tər] pl. levatores
Etymology: L, levare, to lift up
1 a muscle that raises a structure of the body, as the levator ani raises parts of the pelvic diaphragm.
2 a surgical instrument used to lift depressed bony fragments in fractures of the skull and other bones.

le·va·tor

(lě-vā'tŏr) [TA]
1. A surgical instrument for prying up the depressed part in a cranial fracture.
2. One of several muscles the action of which is to raise the part into which it is inserted.
[L. a lifter, fr. levo, pp. -atus, to lift, fr. levis, light]

levator

1. Any muscle that acts to raise a part of the body.
2. An elevator. A surgical instrument used to prize up a depressed piece of bone as after a fracture of ZYGOMA or skull.

abductor

or

levator

any muscle that moves a limb away from the body An example of an abductor is the abductor pollicis, which moves the thumb outward. Compare ADDUCTOR.

levator

muscle whose action elevates tissue or part into which it inserts

le·va·tor

(lě-vā'tŏr) [TA]
1. A surgical instrument for prying up the depressed part in a fracture of the skull.
2. One of several muscles with an action to raise the part to which it inserts.
[L. a lifter, fr. levo, pp. -atus, to lift, fr. levis, light]

levator

pl. levatores [L.]
1. a muscle that elevates an organ or structure, e.g. the levator labii muscle.
2. an instrument for raising depressed osseous fragments in fractures.
References in periodicals archive ?
In this phase, a standardized protocol using ventral prostate, seminal vesicles with coagulating glands, levator ani and bulbocavernosus muscle complex, Cowper's glands, and glans penis was successfully tested against a reference androgen compound, testosterone propionate (TP), and a reference antagonist, flutamide (OECD 2001).
The levator muscle can be evaluated on vaginal exam by pressing gently with one finger at both 4 o'clock and 8 o'clock.
Denervation potentials were found in the right rhomboid major and levator scapula muscles by needle electromyography (EMG).
Initial EMG studies were performed on 58 primiparous women in the early third trimester, providing baseline data on muscle function at four separate sites of the levator ani.
17) When muscle activity does not increase, an imbalance between the levator and the palatoglossus muscles results in posterior displacement of the soft palate and obstruction at the retropalatal level.
the mandibular lamina (the depressor labii inferioris, the mentalis, the risorius, the depressor anguli oris, the inferior part of the orbicularis oris, and perhaps the buccinator and the levator anguli otis)
They originate on the floor near the pharyngeal ostium and expand between the tensor and levator veli palatini muscles.
Twelve of the 21 women also were treated with yeast suppressive therapy, and 14 underwent physical therapy for levator muscle hypertonus, noted Dr.
Regardless of technique, the central part of the upper eyelid should not be injected in order to avoid paralysis of the levator palpebrae superioris and subsequent ptosis.
Aggressive levatorplasty may lead to levator spasms and dyschezia.
Traction on the uvula during its amputation should be avoided because this would result in excessive shortening of the uvula and interruption of the insertions of the levator palati muscles into the muscularis uvula.
The strong upward traction of the levator ani muscles is much more important in maintaining vaginal outlet support than are the bulbocavernosus and superficial transverse perineal muscle.