leukorrhea


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leukorrhea

 [loo″ko-re´ah]
a white to yellow viscid discharge from the vagina or uterine cavity, which may be a symptom of a disorder either in the reproductive organs or elsewhere in the body. The glands of the vagina normally secrete a certain amount of mucuslike fluid that moistens the vaginal membranes. This is often increased at the time of ovulation and before a menstrual period, and it is also stimulated by sexual excitement, whether or not coitus takes place. Excessive discharge, however, may indicate an abnormal condition. A yellow or creamy white discharge, especially if it is thick, often contains pus and provides evidence of an infection. A thinner discharge, such as one that seems to be clear mucus, usually indicates that the disorder is chronic, but of less significance.
Causes. Frequent causes are trichomoniasis, candidiasis, and bacterial vaginosis. The discharge of trichomoniasis is usually yellowish, odorous, and pruritic. Candidiasis is distinguished by a thin to thick white discharge with irritation and itching. Women with bacterial vaginosis often complain of a gray to yellow discharge with an offensive, fishy odor.

Another cause of leukorrhea is infection of the cervix during childbirth. The infection irritates the mucous glands of the cervix, causing them to secrete excessive mucus. sexually transmitted diseases, especially gonorrhea and chlamydiosis, are also common causes of leukorrhea. When the discharge is profuse, thick, and yellowish and there is a burning sensation during urination, gonorrhea or chlamydiosis should be suspected. Other bacteria and fungi may also be causes of leukorrhea, such as infections of the genital tract originating from foreign bodies like tampons, diaphragms, and pessaries that are left in the vagina too long.

Leukorrhea sometimes is an early indication of cervical cancer, or of benign conditions, such as polyps or leiomyoma uteri. It may also be caused by pelvic congestion associated with heart disease, by malnutrition, or by inflammation of the fallopian tubes as a result of tuberculosis. In later years, the disorder may be caused by simple debility; see also atrophic vaginitis.

leu·kor·rhe·a

(lū'kō-rē'ă),
Discharge from the vagina of a white or yellowish viscid fluid containing mucus and pus cells.
Synonym(s): leukorrhagia
[leuko- + G. rhoia, flow]

leukorrhea

/leu·kor·rhea/ (-re´ah) a whitish, viscid discharge from the vagina and uterine cavity.

leukorrhea

also

leucorrhea

(lo͞o′kə-rē′ə)
n.
A thick, whitish discharge from the vagina or cervical canal.

leu′kor·rhe′al adj.

leukorrhea

[lo̅o̅′kôrē′ə]
Etymology: Gk, leukos + rhoia, flow
a white discharge from the vagina. Normally, vaginal discharge occurs in regular variations of amount and consistency during the course of the menstrual cycle. A greater than usual amount is normal in pregnancy, and a decrease is to be expected after delivery, during lactation, and after menopause. Leukorrhea is the most common reason for women to seek gynecological care. Also spelled leucorrhoea. See also vaginal discharge.

leukorrhea

Gynecology A nonspecific whitish malodorous vaginal discharge accompanied by dyspareunia and intense pruritus, which may be caused by infection–eg, Candida albicans, Gardnerella vaginalis, T vaginalis, N gonorrhoeae, foreign bodies, estrogen depletion, neoplasms, and as a postpartum phenomenon

leu·kor·rhe·a

(lū'kōr-ē'ă)
Discharge from the vagina of a white or yellowish viscid fluid.
Synonym(s): leukorrhagia, leucorrhoea, leukorrhoea.
[leuko- + G. rhoia, flow]

leukorrhea

a whitish or yellowish, viscid discharge from the vagina or uterine cavity, which may be a sign of a disorder either in the reproductive organs or elsewhere in the body.
References in periodicals archive ?
Except for the leukorrhea group, which had the fewest patients with a pain syndrome, and the DIV group, which had a 25% rate of pain syndromes, the rates were in the 45%-50% range, which is twice as high as the rate of these syndromes in the general population, he said.
Such documentation can enable modern research to conduct appropriate scientific studies on the medicinal plants towards discovery of new anti-microbial drugs against which the microorganisms involved in infectious leukorrhea may prove more susceptible.
When questioned, it was noted that the TMPs did not distinguish between normal leukorrhea and leukorrhea arising out of microbial infections.
Saline wet preps also were performed to rule out infections such as trichomoniasis, candidiasis, and bacterial vaginosis (BV) or to screen for leukorrhea.
Goldstein said, while the trial did investigate the incidence of endometrial cancer in such a cohort, it overlooked other effects on the lower genital tract such as endometrial hyperplasia, polyps, leukorrhea, and vaginal dryness.
In the clinical trial, the safety and tolerability profile of Menostar was comparable to placebo; the most frequently reported side effects were application site irritation, joint pain and leukorrhea.
In the clinical trials, Menostar was well tolerated; the most common side effects were application site irritation and leukorrhea.
Additional adverse events not listed in Table 10 that occurred in 1 to 2% of Gonal-F treated patients in the US ovulation induction study included the following: leukorrhea, vaginal hemorrhage, migraine, fatigue, asthma, nervousness, somnolence, and hypotension.