leukoplakic vulvitis


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Related to leukoplakic vulvitis: leukoplakia

leukoplakic vulvitis

[-plā′kik]
Etymology: Gk, leukos, white, plakos, plate, vulva + itis, inflammation
a condition in which the skin of the vulva becomes thick and white, develops bleeding fissures, and later becomes atrophic. The condition may progress to cancer.

atrophy of the vulva

The reduction in structural complexity of vulvar tissue that commonly occurs with advancing age, which is manifest externally by drying, shrivelling and white patches. Formally known as kraurosis vulvae.

Clinical findings
Often asymptomatic; less commonly, itching, dyspareunia, dysuria and tenderness.
 
Treatment
Topical corticosteroids.

vulvitis

(vul-vit'is) [ vulva + -it is]
Inflammation of the vulva.

acute nongonorrheal vulvitis

Vulvitis resulting from chafing of the opposed lips of the vulva, nonvenereal infection, or accumulated sebaceous material around the clitoris.

desquamative vulvitis

Erosion or scarring of the vulva as a result of immunological or blistering conditions, such as contact dermatitis, lichen planus, lupus, or squamous cell carcinoma.

follicular vulvitis

Inflammation of the hair follicles of the vulva.

gangrenous vulvitis

Necrosis and sloughing of areas of the vulva, often a complication of infectious diseases such as diphtheria, scarlatina, herpes genitalis, or typhoid fever.

leukoplakic vulvitis

Lichen sclerosis et atrophicus.

mycotic vulvitis

Vulvitis caused by various fungi, most commonly Candida albicans.

plasma cellularis vulvitis

, plasma cell vulvitis
Inflammation and edema of the vulva, with infiltration of the upper dermis by plasma cells and other inflammatory cells. This rare, benign condition causes itching, burning, and discomfort during sex or urination. The vulvitis is characterized by macular patches with sharply defined borders on the inside of the vulva near the vagina. Biopsy is recommended to rule out infection, lichen planus or vulvar neoplasia (plasma cells are found on biopsy). Topical corticosteroids or, occasionally, antibiotic creams are used to treat the infection. Excision or other destructive procedures may be helpful but do not prevent recurrences of the vulvitis.
Synonym: Zoon's vulvitis