leukocytoclastic vasculitis


Also found in: Acronyms.

leu·ko·cy·to·clas·tic vas·cu·li·tis

cutaneous acute vasculitis characterized clinically by palpable purpura, especially of the legs, and histologically by exudation of the neutrophils and sometimes fibrin around dermal venules, with nuclear dust and extravasation of red cells; may be limited to the skin or involve other tissues as in Henoch-Schönlein purpura.
See also: cutaneous vasculitis.
[G. leukos, white, + kytos, cell, + klastos, broken, fr. klao, to break]

leukocytoclastic vasculitis

[lo̅o̅′kəsī′təklas′tik]
an allergic inflammation of blood vessels, characterized by deposits of fragmented cells, nuclear dust, necrotic debris, and fibrin staining in the vessels. Many patients develop skin lesions, particularly on the legs, accompanied by arthralgia and fever. The disorder is seen in rheumatoid arthritis and other diseases.
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Leukocytoclastic vasculitis: characteristic skin lesions

allergic vasculitis

A form of nonthrombocytopenic purpura due to a hypersensitivity vasculitis associated with urticaria, erythema, arthritis, gastrointestinal symptoms and renal involvement.

leukocytoclastic vasculitis

Cutaneous necrotizing vasculitis A form of vasculitis with fragmentation of neutrophil nuclei, immune complex deposition–direct immunofluorescence demonstrates IgG, IgM and complement deposition, that elicits neutrophilic 'suicide' and deposition of abundant nuclear 'dust', necrotic debris and fibrin, most common in small post-capillary venules; the condition may be local–eg, cutaneous or systemic. See Vasculitis.

leu·ko·cy·to·clas·tic vas·cu·li·tis

(lū'kō-sī-tō-klas'tik vas'kyū-lī'tis)
Cutaneous acute vasculitis characterized clinically by palpable purpura, especially of the legs, and histologically by exudation of the neutrophils and sometimes fibrin around dermal venules, with nuclear dust and extravasation of red blood cells; may be limited to the skin or involve other tissues as in Henoch-Schönlein purpura.
See also: cutaneous vasculitis
[G. leukos, white, + kytos, cell, + klastos, broken, fr. klao, to break]

leukocytoclastic vasculitis

see hypersensitivity angiitis.
References in periodicals archive ?
Leukocytoclastic vasculitis is listed as a possible adverse event in the product labeling for most monoclonal antibody therapies, Dr.
During a medical screening program for former Department of Energy (DOE) workers by the Johns Hopkins University Former Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Workers Program (Espanola, NM) a 63-year-old white male expressed concern that his diagnoses of microscopic polyangiitis, systemic necrotizing vasculitis, leukocytoclastic vasculitis, pulmonary interstitial fibrosis, and glomerulonephritis were related to silica exposure.
Conclusion: Both dermatologists and pediatricians must be familiar with this rare type of leukocytoclastic vasculitis.
Additionally, erythema elevatum diutinum, a leukocytoclastic vasculitis of the skin that resolves with fibrosis, can present with lesions that mimic dermatofibromas (9).
According to some case reports, (3,5) an appearance resembling leukocytoclastic vasculitis can be seen, but this was not demonstrated in our case.
The diagnosis was confirmed with findings on biopsy of leukocytoclastic vasculitis and spotty fibrin deposition.
However, there are research studies indicating that HCV is associated with various extrahepatic manifestations including mixed cryoglobulinemia (MC), membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis (MPGN), non-Hodgkin lymphoma, Sjogren syndrome, porphyria cutaneous tarda, lichen planus, leukocytoclastic vasculitis, and various endocrine and neurologic manifestations.
8] Less often, there may be a pattern of leukocytoclastic vasculitis with granulomatous changes and areas of focal dermal necrosis.
Cutaneous acanthamoeba infection associated with leukocytoclastic vasculitis in an AIDS patient.
Extrahepatic Manifestations of Hepatitis C Hematologic Mixed cryoglobulinemia B-cell non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Autoimmune Lymphocytic sialadenitis Autoantibodies Idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura Renal Membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis Mebranous nephropathy Fibrillary glomerulonephritis Rapid progressive glomerulonephritis IgA nephropathy Dermatologic Porphyria cutanea tarda Leukocytoclastic vasculitis Lichen planus Neurologic Peripheral neuropathy Guillain-Barre syndrome Endocrine Hypothyroidism Diabetes mellitus
According to this schema, major criteria include (1) abrupt onset of tender or painful erythematous or violaceous plaques or nodules and (2) predominantly neutrophilic infiltration in the dermis without leukocytoclastic vasculitis.