leukemogenesis


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leukemogenesis

 [loo-ke″mo-jen´ĕ-sis]
the induction or development of leukemia.

leu·ke·mo·gen·e·sis

(lū-kē'mō-jen'ĕ-sis),
The causation (or induction), development, and progression of a leukemic disease.
[leukemia + G. genesis, production]

leukemogenesis

[lo̅o̅kē′mōjen′əsis]
the onset, development, or progression of leukemia.

leukemogenesis

A process in which successive transformational events enhance the ability of hematopoietic progenitor cells to proliferate, differentiate, and survive. See Autonomous proliferation.

leu·ke·mo·gen·e·sis

(lū-kē'mō-jen'ĕ-sis)
The causation (or induction), development, and progression of a leukemic disease.
Synonym(s): leukaemogenesis.
[leukemia + G. genesis, production]

leukemogenesis

the process of generation of myeloid cell lines in bone marrow and extramedullary sites; a critical feature in myeloproliferative disease; i.e. the induction or development of leukemia.
References in periodicals archive ?
The role of a Runt domain transcription factor AML1/RUNX1 in leukemogenesis and its clinical imphcations.
The hypothesis that multiple mutations are required for leukemogenesis was experimentally proven for the first time by a group in the USA using transgenic mice of PML-RARa.
4 It is conside-red as a founder genetic lesion which initiates the pro-cess of leukemogenesis in approximately 60% of nor-mal karyotype AML (NK AML).
Mechanisms of leukemogenesis induced by bovine leukemia virus: prospects for novel anti-retroviral therapies in humans.
Deletion on chromosome 13, which is the most frequent chromosomal abnormality in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), had been suspected for long to contribute to leukemogenesis, although studies had failed to identify a causal gene.
Dunbar, "The yin and yang of stem cell gene therapy: insights into hematopoiesis, leukemogenesis, and gene therapy safety," Hematology, pp.
This suggests that most patients had a heterozygous NPM1 mutation in the majority of their cells, which is consistent with studies from others and the likelihood that NPM1 mutations are acquired early in leukemogenesis (Thiede et al.
Translocations, deletions, inversions, and other rearrangements are structural chromosomal abnormalities that comprise genes with oncogenic potential, which activate specific differentiation or proliferation pathways and cause the progression of leukemogenesis (1).
Furthermore, miR-150 may have an important impact on T-cell development and physiology by targeting NOTCH3, a member of the Notch receptor family that plays important roles in both T-cell differentiation and leukemogenesis (33).
The study was specifically designed to collect information on several environmental exposures potentially associated with leukemogenesis.