jurisprudence

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Related to legal philosophy: jurisprudence, Philosophy of law

jurisprudence

 [jo̳r″is-proo´dens]
the science of the law.
medical jurisprudence the science of the law as applied to the practice of medicine; see also forensic medicine.

jur·is·pru·dence

(jūr'is-prū'dens),
The science of law, its principles and concepts.
[L. juris prudentia, knowledge of law]

jurisprudence

/jur·is·pru·dence/ (jldbomacr″is-proo´dens) the science of the law.
medical jurisprudence  the science of the law as applied to the practice of medicine.

jurisprudence

[jo̅o̅′rispro̅o̅′dəns]
Etymology: L, jus, law, prudentia, knowledge
the science and philosophy of law. Medical jurisprudence relates to the interfacing of medicine with criminal and civil law.

jurisprudence

The science of law. Medical jurisprudence is another term for FORENSIC MEDICINE.

jur·is·pru·dence

(jūr'is-prū'dĕns)
Legal principles and concepts.

jurisprudence

(jŏŏr´isproo´dəns),
n the philosophy of law.
jurisprudence, dental (forensic dentistry),
n 1. the science that teaches the application of every branch of dental knowledge to the purposes of the law; this also includes the elucidation of doubtful legal questions.
n 2. the state laws and codes covering the legal limitations of the practice of the profession of dentistry.
n the science that applies the principles and practice of the different branches of medicine in the elucidation of doubtful questions in a court of justice. Also called
forensic medicine.

jurisprudence

the science of the law.

medical jurisprudence
the science of the law as applied to the practice of medicine.
References in periodicals archive ?
But if we are to make a sober and balanced assessment of these assumptions and their implications for legal philosophy and science, it is of the utmost importance that we do not consider Ross's theory in a suboptimal version that makes it vulnerable to irrelevant objections.
the assumption that the defining feature of legal philosophy is
The Constitutional State is unfailingly intelligent and provocative, and should be welcomed by students of constitutional theory, constitutional law, political science, and legal philosophy.
The answer to this question, which will not satisfy most of those to whom it might occur to ask it, is that the prevailing norms of analytic legal philosophy demand that an inquiry into the nature of law be a search for the necessary (or essential (89)) features of law.
According to Elias, some of the points alluded to in the discussion of African legal theory "may serve the purpose of inducing re-assessment of some of the controversial subjects of accepted Western legal philosophy.
Specifically, I turn in section II to the view that Kelsen's legal philosophy is formalistic, a charge levelled by many writers.
IBM's leasing model seemed to challenge the entire legal philosophy of US competition policy that was established in the New Deal era.
A charming blend of excellent lyrical poetry and a touch of legal philosophy, promoting the rights, freedom, and dignity of everyone whether they be on the defense or the plaintiff.
Lamer defended his legal philosophy in a 1995 address before the Empire Club of Canada.
But there is a flip side to the Constitution's serving as "higher law," and I discuss this with my students in most of my courses on legal philosophy or jurisprudence.
While his assessment of the nihilism of the right-wing lawyers of the Federalist Society is dead on, the chapter on legal philosophy is a tough read, meandering through John Rawls and Aquinas, Aeschylus and Abbe Sieyes.
Here I concentrated on legal philosophy and specifically Kelsen's legal positivism because this is the legal theory with the most abstract view of law and the least interested in whether laws actually achieve the objectives they were meant to attain.