lectin


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Related to lectin: lecithin

lectin

 [lek´tin]
a term applied to hemagglutinating substances present in saline extracts of certain plant seeds, which specifically agglutinate erythrocytes of certain blood groups or stimulate lymphocyte proliferation.

lec·tin

(lek'tin),
Any of a group of glycoproteins of primarily plant (usually seed) origin that binds to glycoproteins on the surface of cells causing agglutination, precipitation, or other phenomena resembling the action of specific antibody; lectins include plant agglutinins (phytoagglutinins, phytohemagglutinins), plant precipitins, and perhaps certain animal proteins; some have mitogenic properties and induce lymphocyte transformation.
[L. lego, pp. lectum, to select, + -in]

lectin

/lec·tin/ (lek´tin) any of a group of hemagglutinating proteins found primarily in plant seeds, which bind specifically to the branching sugar molecules of glycoproteins and glycolipids on the surface of cells.

lectin

(lĕk′tĭn)
n.
Any of various proteins or glycoproteins that bind to the sugar molecules of glycoproteins and glucolipids on the surfaces of cells and are found in most organisms, especially plants. They are used to stimulate lymphocyte proliferation and to agglutinate red blood cells.

lectin

[lek′tin]
a protein in seeds and other parts of certain plants that binds with glycoproteins and glycolipids on the surface of animal cells, causing agglutination. Some lectins agglutinate erythrocytes in specific blood groups, and others stimulate the production of T lymphocytes.

lec·tin

(lek'tin)
A protein of primarily plant (usually seed) origin that binds to glycoproteins on the surface of cells causing agglutination, precipitation, or other phenomena resembling the action of specific antibody; lectins include plant agglutinins (phytoagglutinins, phytohemagglutinins), plant precipitins, and perhaps some animal proteins; some have mitogenic properties.
[L. lego, pp. lectum, to select, + -in]

lectin

one of a group of proteins that specifically bind or crosslink carbohydrates. Lectins are poisonous compounds often produced in plants and their seeds, for example ricin is produced by beans of the castor plant Ricinus communis, and has the potential to be used as an agent of BIOLOGICAL WARFARE. If present in high amount (more than a few parts per thousand) in the body, lectins can cause blood clotting and interfere with the IMMUNE SYSTEM. Absorbed into the bloodstream they may cause cancer.

lectin

1. hemagglutinating substances present in saline extracts of certain plant seeds, which agglutinate erythrocytes of certain blood groups or stimulate lymphocyte proliferation.
2. antinutritive factors in legume seeds; interfere with protein digestion in monogastric livestock.
References in periodicals archive ?
After dialyzing, the fractions with maximum lectin activity (40-90% ammonium sulfate) were employed in the anion-exchange chromatography.
Structural, functional, and lectin histochemical characteristics of rat ovaries and endometrium in experimental hyper- and hypothyroidism.
Settlement-inducing activities of SC (50 mg) and GF/C filter papers (0, 21 mm) containing OSE (100 mg SC eq per GF/C; OSE paper) were assayed in the presence of LCA, concanavalin A (ConA), soybean lectin (SBA), and wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) at concentrations of 0 [micro]g/mL, 0.
As a result, a single lectin was used for the detection of glycans on multiple proteins.
It showed that rats fed on the GM potatoes with the snowdrop lectin developed unusual changes to their gut tissue.
The dispersion fluid of microencapsulation was assayed for untrapped lectin in Korean mistletoe extract (0.
We think that some of this has to do with the plant producing enough lectin that it just becomes so unpalatable that the insects can't feed and they starve to death.
With the aim to immobilize any lectin, the primary amino groups of the spacer arm may be activated with glutaraldehyde.
Tokyo, Japan, Dec 20, 2005 - (JCN) - The National Institute of Advanced Science and Technology (AIST) has developed the first scanner using the evanescent wave-excited fluorescent detection method and a sugar chain profiling system utilizing lectin micro-arrays in the world.
Among fish deprived of food, for instance, those that received PCBs had a less-active form of the protein called lectin in their blood than did fish whose diets were free of PCBs.