learned helplessness


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learned help·less·ness

(lĕrnd help'les-nes),
A laboratory model of depression involving both classical (respondent) and instrumental (operant) conditioning techniques; application of unavoidable shock is followed by failure to cope in situations in which coping might otherwise be possible.

learned helplessness

[lurnd]
a behavioral state and personality trait of a person who believes that he or she is ineffectual, his or her responses are futile, and control over reinforcers in the environment has been lost. It may be seen in depression.
Animal behaviour A state of apathy or passiveness induced in experimental animals by classic—respondent or operant—instrumental conditioning
Geriatrics A state of over-dependency discordant with the degree of physical and mental disability seen in nursing home patients
Psychiatry A state in which a person attempts to maintain a relationship with another by adopting a helpless, powerless stance

learned helplessness

Geriatric medicine A state of overdependency discordant with the degree of physical and mental disability seen in nursing home Pts Psychiatry A condition in which a person attempts to establish and maintain contact with another by adopting a helpless, powerless stance.

learn·ed help·less·ness

(lĕrnd help'lĕs-nĕs)
A laboratory model of depression involving both classical (respondent) and instrumental (operant) conditioning techniques; application of unavoidable shock is followed by failure to cope in situations where coping might otherwise be possible.

learned helplessness

A state of deep passivity with lack of motivation, cognitive deficit and depression, liable to affect patients trapped in aversive situations such as prolonged inpatient stay or inadequate institutional care. The condition is remediable.

learned helplessness

a state of apathy and hopelessness in which the individual feels unable to affect outcomes, resulting from repeated exposure to uncontrollable situations.
References in periodicals archive ?
Effect of methylxanthine and amphetamine on learned helplessness in rats.
The reformulated attributional model (RAM) of learned helplessness and depression (Abramson, Seligman, & Teasdale, 1978) has been used to predict behavioral outcomes in achievement, health, and pyschopathological paradigms.
Reversal of performance deficits in learned helplessness and depression.
Luskin, a Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist added that "if the long-term unemployed do not pursue alternatives in their job search, they may experience learned helplessness, a condition and syndrome that can develop from a constant inability to succeed in finding satisfactory employment.
Abramson LY, Garber J, Seligman MEP: Learned helplessness in humans.
The emotional numbing seen in rats exhibiting learned helplessness and in patients with PTSD may be related to the increased release of endorphins as a result of stress.
Martin Seligman developed the theory of learned helplessness, and defined it as the motivational and behavioral deficits displayed by humans when exposed to uncontrollable circumstances.
This theory has also been influenced by Seligman's theory of learned helplessness and attribution theory (Peterson, Maier, & Seligman, 1993) as well as the concept of self-talk (Meichenbaum, 1995).
More specifically, the reformulated model of learned helplessness contended that when an individual is faced with a bad or aversive situation, he or she will tend to attribute that situation to some cause (Abramson, Seligman, & Teasdale, 1978).
Provides a way of avoiding learned helplessness on the part of families, and thus, helps to break the cycle of dependency;
It includes the following ten subscales (which were based on the literature regarding depressive symptoms): Low Energy (the presence of fatigue), Cognitive Difficulty (indecision and difficulty thinking clearly), Guilt (the presence of guilty feelings), Low Self-Esteem (diminished self-esteem), Social Introversion (social withdrawal and feelings of isolation), Pessimism (a pessimistic and hopeless outlook), Irritability (being irritable, having a quick temper, and being intolerant of others), Sad Mood (experiencing feelings of sadness), Instrumental Helplessness (actively eliciting help or sympathy from others, yet finding it lacking), and Learned Helplessness (having a passive attitude toward life and feeling helpless).
The role of expectations and attributions in the alleviation of learned helplessness.