learn


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learn

(lĕrn)
To gain knowledge, understanding, or skill through study or practice.
[O.E. leornian]
References in classic literature ?
The great ambition of the older people was to try to learn to read the Bible before they died.
Laugh at your mistakes but learn from them, joke over your troubles but gather strength from them, make a jest of your difficulties but overcome them.
Most of the first month of his life had been passed thus in sleeping; but now he could see quite well, and he stayed awake for longer periods of time, and he was coming to learn his world quite well.
But they learned, just as men learn to smoke; though it is far easier to learn to smoke than to learn to drink.
Of these stories the minstrels used to learn only the outline, and each told the story in his own way, filling it in according to his own fancy.
It is worth the expense of youthful days and costly hours, if you learn only some words of an ancient language, which are raised out of the trivialness of the street, to be perpetual suggestions and provocations.
Then nothing should be more sternly laid down than that the inhabitants of your fair city should by all means learn geometry.
Every one being allowed to learn to read, ruineth in the long run not only writing but also thinking.
Whether it be instinctive or whether it result from the pedestrian education of childhood may be doubtful; it is, at any rate, less automatic than the previous acts, for a man might by conscious effort learn to perform it more skilfully, or even to suppress it altogether.
If you don't try to learn what is more necessary than anything for a Christian," said his father, getting up, "whatever can interest you?
And a lovely thing it must be,' said Riderhood, 'fur to learn young folks wot's right, and fur to know wot THEY know wot you do it.
I'm to learn drawing this half; I wonder if I shall learn to make dogs and donkeys