leachate


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leachate

(lēch′āt)
1. A contaminated liquid that leaves soil after water percolates through earth (e.g., in waste disposal sites), farmlots, or landfills.
2. Any product of percolation.
References in periodicals archive ?
For the leachate formation the artificial soil profile were made for that lysimeter (device used to measure rate of movement of water through or from a soil layers) was used to collect the percolated water for leachate quality analysis.
According to the council a treatment plant has to be installed now as evidence indicates present arrangements for dealing with leachates from the tip are "insufficient".
Lebanon is irrigating some of its agricultural plains using waters contaminated by leachate generated from open dumps," reads the MORES report.
With the LBG technology we can use leachate as a resource.
In radicle and plumule growth both inhibition and stimulation by leaf and bark leachate treatments were observed (Table 1).
According to Buckmaster's results, shredded corn stalks produced about 11 percent more leachates than chopped and 5 percent more than stalks that had been chopped and put through a roller.
In some areas of Florida where unlined C&D landfills are located, leachate gets into the groundwater.
For the surface water, pH was measured, and for the leachate, pH, Fe, and S[O.
Leachate comes from water percolating through landfills; it may contain undesirable or toxic chemicals.
Integrated samples of leachates were collected from randomly selected leachate drains at the site in accordance with American Public Health Association (APHA) Standard 1060A3 (APHA, 1998).
Landfills have potential to pollute the three principal environmental media--the atmosphere, the lithosphere, and the hydrosphere [2, 3] by generating landfill gas and leachate by the anaerobic decomposition of organic wastes.