lazy


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lazy

Medspeak
adjective Slow-moving, sluggish—e.g., lazy bladder, lazy bowel, lazy eye.

Vox populi
adjective Resistant to work or exertion; disposed to idleness or indolence.
References in classic literature ?
But the lazy girl answered, 'Do you think I am going to dirty my hands for you?
The lazy girl was delighted at this, and thought to herself, 'The gold will soon be mine.
The man groaned a good deal and said he had overworked himself by chopping the logs, but the Scarecrow gave him two more tablets than he had promised, which seemed to comfort the lazy fellow.
They used to be a very brave race, but since they were able to get rum for their timber and ivory, they're a lazy and drunken lot.
Moses is awkward as well as lazy," said the doctor.
In lazy wonder, I turn my head on the pillow, and look on the other side of my bed.
But they hadn't gone far when they passed two women, one of whom said to the other: "Shame on that lazy lout to let his poor little son trudge along.
After two happy months of lazy coasting round the shores of England, all that remained of Natalie's illness was represented by a delicious languor in her eyes, and an utter inability to devote herself to anything which took the shape of a serious occupation.
He was too lazy even for a mere demagogue, for a workman orator, for a leader of labour.
I'll tell you what I think is the matter: you are a lazy fellow.
Even the lazy gentleman with his hat on one side and his hands in his pockets, who has dispensed so much consolation by inquiring with a yawn of another gentleman whether he is 'going across' - as if it were a ferry - even he condescends to look that way, and nod his head, as who should say, 'No mistake about THAT:' and not even the sage Lord Burleigh in his nod, included half so much as this lazy gentleman of might who has made the passage (as everybody on board has found out already; it's impossible to say how) thirteen times without a single accident
Whenever the Dodger or Charley Bates came home at night, empty-handed, he would expatiate with great vehemence on the misery of idle and lazy habits; and would enforce upon them the necessity of an active life, by sending them supperless to bed.