lax

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lax

(lăks)
adj. laxer, laxest
1. Not taut, firm, or compact; slack.
2. Loose and not easily retained or controlled. Used of bowel movements.

lax·a′tion n.
lax′ly adv.
lax′ness n.

lax

1 abbreviation for laxative.
2 pertaining to a condition of relaxation or looseness.

lax

(lăks) [L. laxus, slack]
1. Without tension.
2. Loose and not easily controlled; said of bowel movements.
References in periodicals archive ?
Laxer argues that it would usher in a more multipolar world in which the global economy was less centred on a U.
With the very notable exception of Alberta, which privatized the Alberta Liquor Control Board (ALCB) in 1993 and established a private liquor retail market to replace it (Flanagan 2003; Laxer et al.
Many of these plans were already badly underfunded, although laxer accounting standards than apply in the private sector have hidden the scale of the problem.
One would think that firms would relocate to jurisdictions with less-stringent environmental regulations due to regulatory cost savings, and thus, strict environmental regulations might favor offshoring to countries with laxer regulations.
There appears to be a much laxer approach in the public sector as the bill is always picked up by the State.
In addition to laxer rules for visits to the island, the protesters demand the right to education in Kurdish for people who speak Kurdish as their mother tongue, as well as the right to use Kurdish in court proceedings.
Desbiens R, Berkovic S, Dubeau F, Andermann F, Laxer K, Harvey S, et al.
Put otherwise: In the college education market, potential customers (students and their parents) know they will have access to credit on terms far laxer than what they would get if they borrowed from a private party without government subsidies, underwriting, or guarantees.
He could also introduce an additional LTRO scheme with laxer borrowing conditions, although this looks unlikely, as the ECB has not yet been able to accurately gauge how successful the previous two LTROs have been.
Rich Laxer, chief executive of GE Capital, added: "The mid-market is a real driver of UK economic growth and this research casts a spotlight on this powerful, highly targeted group of companies with strong growth potential, even in these challenging economic conditions.
Laxer rules on subsidies almost always result in an expensive competition among local governments for economic development.