lavender

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lavender

/lav·en·der/ (lav´en-der)
1. any plant of the genus Lavandula.
2. a preparation of the flowers of L. angustifolia or of the lavender oil extracted from them; used for loss of appetite, dyspepsia, nervousness, and insomnia; also widely used in folk medicine.
A perennial herb that contains coumarins—e.g., coumarin and umbelliferone, flavonoids, tannins, triterpenoids, and volatile oils. Lavender is said to have antibacterial, carminative and sedative effects

lavender,

n Latin names:
Lavandula officinalis, Lavandula latifolia, Lavandula angustifolia, Lavandula stoechas; part used: flowers; uses: sedative, anxiolytic, insomnia, appetite stimulant, aromatherapy; precautions: CNS depression. Also called
aspic, echter lavendel, English lavender, esplieg, French lavender, garden lavender, lavanda, lavande commun, lavandin, nardo, Spanish lavender, spigo, spike lavender, or
true lavender.
References in classic literature ?
Her ladyship was feebly merry (the result, no doubt, of the exhilarating properties of the red lavender draught) on the subject of Mrs.
This arranged, her ladyship was free to refresh herself with another dose of the red lavender draught, and to sleep the sleep of the just who close their eyes with the composing conviction that they have done their duty.
It was contrary to all rule and precedent; it savored of quackery--the red lavender had no business to do what the red lavender had done--but there she was, nevertheless, up and dressed, and contemplating a journey to London on the next day but one.
This was old Christopher Casby--recognisable at a glance--as unchanged in twenty years and upward as his own solid furniture--as little touched by the influence of the varying seasons as the old rose-leaves and old lavender in his porcelain jars.
Tall (3 to 4 foot) lavenders should be cut back by about 1/3 to keep plants from getting overly woody (start the second year).
Like all lavenders, the Canary Island species (Lavandula multifida), flowers on and off throughout the year.
plenty of reasons to grow For centuries, lavenders (Lavandula) have been prized as handsome landscape plants and for their clean-scented flowers.
My final visit was to Downderry Nursery in Tonbridge, Kent, to meet Simon Charlesworth, who started collecting lavenders in his greenhouse 23 years ago.
Bee plus: Lavender's a hit with insects Luxuriating in lavenders ON a hot day recently we were filming for Gardeners' World for our Plants and People section.
The English lavenders (some examples include Hidcote, Munstead, or Jean Davis) are perfect for fragrance, while Lavandin varieties (such as Grosso, Provence, and Grappenhall) produce more flowers with a higher concentration of essential oil making them a kitchen choice.
The true lavenders (Lavandula angustifolia) you prune early in spring and throughout summer.
LAVENDERS are one of the best-known and best-loved of all of our garden plants.