lavender

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lavender

/lav·en·der/ (lav´en-der)
1. any plant of the genus Lavandula.
2. a preparation of the flowers of L. angustifolia or of the lavender oil extracted from them; used for loss of appetite, dyspepsia, nervousness, and insomnia; also widely used in folk medicine.
A perennial herb that contains coumarins—e.g., coumarin and umbelliferone, flavonoids, tannins, triterpenoids, and volatile oils. Lavender is said to have antibacterial, carminative and sedative effects

lavender,

n Latin names:
Lavandula officinalis, Lavandula latifolia, Lavandula angustifolia, Lavandula stoechas; part used: flowers; uses: sedative, anxiolytic, insomnia, appetite stimulant, aromatherapy; precautions: CNS depression. Also called
aspic, echter lavendel, English lavender, esplieg, French lavender, garden lavender, lavanda, lavande commun, lavandin, nardo, Spanish lavender, spigo, spike lavender, or
true lavender.
References in periodicals archive ?
It can be enjoyed as a low hedge, edging a pathway, spilling out of borders or even, for me, just looking at fields of lavender grown commercially, tumbling down fields in the heat of Provence.
Where lavender thrives in hot and dry climates, New England gardens offer many wet and soggy summers and cold snow instead of soft rains in the winter.
Harvest lavender just as the buds are beginning to open, when the essential oils are at their peak.
Despite being a marathon affair, this was to be a contest that was won and lost on the first circuit and Lavenders Grant duly broke well from the 'pinging' three-box to poach an early advantage.
If you decide to plant lavender in a container, be careful about watering because if it dries out badly you are unlikely to be able to resuscitate it.
Common lavender normally grows in cold regions, such as Furano, in central Hokkaido, but the top Japanese automaker said it has developed Dome Blue, or Lavandula angustifolia, which can grow in hot and humid environments as part of its bio-related business.
In the 16th and 17th centuries, lavender was used extensively not only for its scent but in cooking.
Most species of lavender originated in the western Mediterranean area but two kinds have been a favourite in Britain for so many centuries that they are sold as ``English'' or ``old English''.
You may know lavender by its scent, but that's only one of this herb's endearing qualities.
Best of all, they're simply smaller lavenders with all of the same great qualities as their parents.
The increasing popularity of lavender - that aromatic shrub - would thus show that the world is headed in a more spiritual direction.
On a warm summer morning outside Victoria, British Columbia, Lynda Dowling strolls between rows of lavender at her farm, Happy Valley Herbs.