lavender

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lavender

/lav·en·der/ (lav´en-der)
1. any plant of the genus Lavandula.
2. a preparation of the flowers of L. angustifolia or of the lavender oil extracted from them; used for loss of appetite, dyspepsia, nervousness, and insomnia; also widely used in folk medicine.
A perennial herb that contains coumarins—e.g., coumarin and umbelliferone, flavonoids, tannins, triterpenoids, and volatile oils. Lavender is said to have antibacterial, carminative and sedative effects

lavender,

n Latin names:
Lavandula officinalis, Lavandula latifolia, Lavandula angustifolia, Lavandula stoechas; part used: flowers; uses: sedative, anxiolytic, insomnia, appetite stimulant, aromatherapy; precautions: CNS depression. Also called
aspic, echter lavendel, English lavender, esplieg, French lavender, garden lavender, lavanda, lavande commun, lavandin, nardo, Spanish lavender, spigo, spike lavender, or
true lavender.
References in periodicals archive ?
Furthermore, both lavender oils (L01 and L02) restored the activity of SOD with the same efficiency in scopolamine-treated rats.
Furthermore, the present study demonstrates that increased activity of the antioxidant enzymes in scopolamine groups exposed to lavender oils is significantly correlated to a decrease of lipid peroxidation (MDA), in the temporal cortex, the most vulnerable cortical area to oxidative stress effects (Karelson et al.
Finally, we reported that DNA cleavage patterns is absent in the scopolamine treated-rats exposed to lavender oils (LW and L02), suggesting that lavender oils possess antiapoptotic and neuroprotective activity.
In summary, the present study indicated that multiple exposures to lavender oils could effectively restore antioxidant brain status and may confer neuroprotection due to alleviation of oxidative damage induced by scopolamine.
The lavender oil is commonly used in aromatherapy and massage therapy (Welsh 1995).
Effects of lavender oil inhalation on improving scopolamine-induced spatial memory impairment in laboratory rats.
Although the medical use of lavender oil is well established and steadily growing, knowledge on its pharmacological mechanism of action is still limited.
Briefly, 60 min after the silexan and lavender oils inhalation, each animal was placed individually in the center of the maze and subjected to working and reference memory tasks, in which same 5 arms (nos.
The maximal antidepressant action by lavender oils was obtained for L01.
These results strongly suggest positive effects of the lavender oils on short-term memory.
Aromatherapists often mention "synergy" as the method by which lavender oils exert their effects.
Contribution to the study of lavandin and the lavender oils.