lavender


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lavender

/lav·en·der/ (lav´en-der)
1. any plant of the genus Lavandula.
2. a preparation of the flowers of L. angustifolia or of the lavender oil extracted from them; used for loss of appetite, dyspepsia, nervousness, and insomnia; also widely used in folk medicine.
A perennial herb that contains coumarins—e.g., coumarin and umbelliferone, flavonoids, tannins, triterpenoids, and volatile oils. Lavender is said to have antibacterial, carminative and sedative effects

lavender,

n Latin names:
Lavandula officinalis, Lavandula latifolia, Lavandula angustifolia, Lavandula stoechas; part used: flowers; uses: sedative, anxiolytic, insomnia, appetite stimulant, aromatherapy; precautions: CNS depression. Also called
aspic, echter lavendel, English lavender, esplieg, French lavender, garden lavender, lavanda, lavande commun, lavandin, nardo, Spanish lavender, spigo, spike lavender, or
true lavender.
References in classic literature ?
I'm his son," said the man to Sophie, among the lavender bushes.
and to the red lavender draught) the commonest regard for consistency made it necessary that she should keep her bed for that day.
Her ladyship was feebly merry (the result, no doubt, of the exhilarating properties of the red lavender draught) on the subject of Mrs.
This arranged, her ladyship was free to refresh herself with another dose of the red lavender draught, and to sleep the sleep of the just who close their eyes with the composing conviction that they have done their duty.
It was contrary to all rule and precedent; it savored of quackery--the red lavender had no business to do what the red lavender had done--but there she was, nevertheless, up and dressed, and contemplating a journey to London on the next day but one.
In a concluding round of great severity, the Reverend Septimus administered and escaped all sorts of punishment, and wound up by getting the old lady's cap into Chancery--such is the technical term used in scientific circles by the learned in the Noble Art-- with a lightness of touch that hardly stirred the lightest lavender or cherry riband on it.
The smell of its jars of old rose-leaves and lavender seems to come upon me even here.
This was old Christopher Casby--recognisable at a glance--as unchanged in twenty years and upward as his own solid furniture--as little touched by the influence of the varying seasons as the old rose-leaves and old lavender in his porcelain jars.
Tulliver, they're mangled beautiful, an' all ready, an' smell o' lavender as it
Munstead Lavender, which actually originates from the Mediterranean countries, is a typical English garden plant.
YOU can dry bunches of lavender by hanging them in a warm, dark place and, after a month they will be ready to stuff into this little character.
Edde is currently promoting lavender to mark the close of its season in Lebanon.