latent period


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period

 [pēr´e-od]
an interval or division of time; the time for the regular recurrence of a phenomenon.
absolute refractory period the part of the refractory period from phase 0 to approximately −60 mV during phase 3; during this time it is impossible for the myocardium to respond with a propagated action potential, even with a strong stimulus. Called also effective refractory period.
blanking period a period of time during and after a pacemaker stimulus when the unstimulated chamber is insensitive to avoid sensing the electronic event in the stimulated chamber.
effective refractory period absolute refractory period.
ejection period the second phase of ventricular systole (0.21 to 0.30 sec), between the opening and closing of the semilunar valves, while the blood is discharged into the aorta and pulmonary artery. Called also sphygmic period.
gestation period see gestation period.
incubation period see incubation period.
isoelectric period the moment in muscular contraction when no deflection of the galvanometer is produced.
latency period
latent period a seemingly inactive period, as that between exposure to an infection and the onset of illness (incubation period) or that between the instant of stimulation and the beginning of response (latency, def. 2).
refractory period the period of depolarization and repolarization of the cell membrane after excitation; during the first portion (absolute refractory period), the nerve or muscle fiber cannot respond to a second stimulus, whereas during the relative refractory period it can respond only to a strong stimulus.
relative refractory period the part of the refractory period from approximately −60 mV during phase 3 to the end of phase 3; during this time a depressed response to a strong stimulus is possible.
safe period the period during the menstrual cycle when conception is considered least likely to occur; it comprises approximately the ten days after menstruation begins and the ten days preceding menstruation. See the section on fertility awareness methods, under contraception.
sphygmic period ejection period.
supernormal period in electrocardiography, a period at the end of phase 3 of the action potential during which activation can be initiated with a milder stimulus than is required at maximal repolarization, because at this time the cell is excitable and closer to threshold than at maximal diastolic potential.
vulnerable period that time at the peak of the T wave during which serious arrhythmias are likely to result if a stimulus occurs.
Wenckebach's period a usually repetitive sequence seen in partial heart block, marked by progressive lengthening of the P–R interval; see also dropped beat.

la·tent pe·ri·od

1. the period elapsing between the application of a stimulus and the response, for example, contraction of a muscle;
2. Synonym(s): incubation period (1)

latent period

n.
1. The interval between exposure to an infectious organism or a carcinogen and the clinical appearance of disease.
2. The interval between stimulus and response.

latent period

the interval between the time of exposure to an injurious dose of radiation and the response.

la·tent pe·ri·od

(lā'tĕnt pēr'ē-ŏd)
1. The duration elapsing between the application of a stimulus and the response, e.g., contraction of a muscle.
2. bioterrorism Interval between exposure to a chemical, toxic, or radiologic agent and the first signs or symptoms.
3. Synonym(s): incubation period (1) .
Latent periodclick for a larger image
Fig. 204 Latent period . A KYMOGRAPH tracing of the ‘twitch'of a frog's gastrocnemius muscle.

latent period

  1. (also called reaction time) the first period of a simple muscle contraction, being the interval between the stimulus being applied and the contraction occurring, usually around 0.01 seconds. See Fig. 204 .
  2. the period from adsorption to the onset of cell LYSIS during BACTERIOPHAGE development.

Latent period

Also called incubation period, the time between infection with a disease-causing agent and the development of disease.
Mentioned in: AIDS

la·tent pe·ri·od

(lā'tĕnt pēr'ē-ŏd)
Duration between application of a stimulus and the response, e.g., contraction of a muscle.

latent

dormant or concealed; not manifest; potential. See also latent image, infection.

latent period
a seemingly inactive period, as that between exposure of tissue to an injurious agent and the manifestations of response, or that between the instant of stimulation and the beginning of response. The latent period in virus replication defines the period from adsorption, penetration and uncoating of the virus until the first progeny virus are released from the cell.
References in periodicals archive ?
In neither case is there a significant shift to later ages over the years, as would have been expected under HIV/AIDS theory, which predicts an increase in the latent period and the length of time during which AIDS patients could survive owing to antiretroviral therapy.
The latent period for influenza is likely to be shorter than that for SARS, which reduces the probability that any infected person will travel before exhibiting symptoms (Table 1).
Broers and lopez [2] showed high correlation between long- term latent period and low infection type.
However, epidemic growth rates in past pandemics are typically not consistent with longer latent periods and low values of [R.
h] ILI rate, per day [iota] Transmission dynamics Incubation and latent period, d [alpha] 1.
SARS-CoV enters the cell by direct fusion and has a latent period of only 6 h.
The characteristics of BPPV on Dix-Hallpike testing are a latent period before the onset of nystagmus, a rotary nystagmus beating toward the under ear that lasts for less than 40 seconds, a reversal of nystagmus upon sitting up, and fatiguing of response on repeat testing.
tau]] is the probability to move to the infectious state on day [tau] of the latent period.
Based on available epidemiologic evidence, the modeling assumes that persons, once infected, experience a non-symptomatic latent period followed by a symptomatic infectious period during which they can transmit primary pneumonic plague to other persons.
To favor donor screening, we deliberately exclude an explicit latent period (during which an infected person is not infectious).