latent infection


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la·tent in·fec·tion

an asymptomatic infection capable of manifesting symptoms under particular circumstances or if activated.

latent infection

an infection that does not produce visible signs of a disease, but may be transmitted to another host.

la·tent in·fec·tion

(lātĕnt in-fekshŭn)
Asymptomatic infection capable of showing symptoms under some circumstances or if activated.

infection

1. invasion and multiplication of microorganisms in body tissues, especially that causing local cellular injury due to competitive metabolism, toxins, intracellular replication or antigen-antibody response.
2. an infectious disease.

acute infection
short duration, of the order of several days.
airborne infection
infection by inhalation of organisms suspended in air on water droplets or dust particles.
arrested infection
restrained in its development by a capsule or adhesion but still containing infective material.
chronic infection
long duration, of the order of weeks or months.
infection control
the utilization of procedures and techniques in the surveillance, investigation and compilation of statistical data in order to reduce the spread of infection, particularly nosocomial infections.
cross infection
infection transmitted between patients infected with different pathogenic microorganisms.
droplet infection
infection due to inhalation of respiratory pathogens suspended on liquid particles exhaled by an animal that is already infected.
dustborne infection
infection by inhalation of pathogens that have become affixed to particles of dust.
endogenous infection
that due to reactivation of organisms present in a dormant focus, as occurs in tuberculosis, etc.
exogenous infection
that caused by organisms not normally present in the body but which have gained entrance from the environment.
general infection
see systemic infection (below).
latent infection
the animal is infected but there are no clinical signs nor infectious agent detectable in discharges.
local infection
has a common syndrome of varying degree, depending on the site and acuteness of the lesion and the type of microorganisms present, including fever, toxemia and leukocytosis with a left shift. The specific individual signs relate to the location of the lesion and the pressure it exerts on nearby organs. See also abscess, cellulitis, phlegmon, osteomyelitis, omphalophlebitis, empyema, adenitis, metritis, mastitis, periphlebitis.
masked infection
an infection is known to occur but the infectious agent cannot be demonstrated, e.g. the sheep-associated malignant catarrhal fever virus.
mixed infection
infection with more than one kind of organism at the same time.
nosocomial infection
pertaining to or acquired in hospital.
opportunistic infection
infection with organisms which are normally harmless but become pathogenic when the body's defense mechanisms are compromised.
patent infection
one in which the infectious agent can be demonstrated in discharges of the patient.
persistent infection
a characteristic of some viruses, particularly herpesviruses and lentiviruses, in which there may be long-lasting or life-long latent infections, with asymptomatic periods and recurring acute episodes of clinical disease (herpesviruses) or onset of severe clinical disease (lentiviruses).
pyogenic infection
infection by pus-producing organisms.
secondary infection
infection by a pathogen following an infection by a pathogen of another kind.
infection stones
see struvite urolith.
subclinical infection
infection associated with no detectable signs but caused by microorganisms capable of producing easily recognizable diseases, such as mastitis or brucellosis; often detected by the production of antibody, or by delayed hypersensitivity exhibited in a skin test reaction to such antigens as tuberculoprotein.
super infection
a second infection occurs in an animal which is already experiencing an infection with another agent.
systemic infection
the infection is widespread throughout the body and must be assumed to be in all organs.
terminal infection
an acute infection occurring near the end of a disease and often causing death.
transmissible infection
an infection capable of being transmitted from one animal to another. Called also contagious.
waterborne infection
infection by microorganisms transmitted in water.
References in periodicals archive ?
Some latent infections remain dormant over a lifetime, while 5 percent to 10 percent advance to active TB disease.
5%) had a positive IgM finding to suggest primary as opposed to latent infection.
Persons who had positive test results indicating infection had chest radiographs to exclude active TB disease and thus establish latent infection (4).
About ten percent of latent infections eventually progresses to active disease which, if left untreated, kills more than fifty percent of those infected [1].
27) A decrease in both in vitro and in vivo oxygen tension leads to a state of non-replication, which causes the latent infection as a mechanism of adaptation.
b) Latent infection period (LIP) (days) calculated as time taken (days) from infection till the development of sporangia on the infection site (Kato et al.
The virus can lurk in these cells for decades as a latent infection.
fructicola on flowers, latent infection on immature fruit, and brown rot at harvest and postharvest
There were two additional cases of latent infection, meaning the people had been exposed to the disease at some point but did not have an active infection.
In our part of world, situation is quite complicated due to high prevalence of latent infection on one hand and vaccination of majority of population with BCG at birth and high prevalence of infection with atypical mycobacteria.
Older adults may get a first attack of shingles following illness or surgery, as a result of latent infection from chickenpox they had as children.
While some people with this latent infection will never develop active TB, five to 10 percent of carriers will become sick in their lifetime.