late tester

late tester

A patient with HIV/AIDS whose immunity has already become severely impaired by the time the disease has been first diagnosed. This designation includes those who have a CD4 T-lymphocyte count of less than 200 cells/μL at the time of diagnosis and those who are first recognized as having HIV/AIDS because they have an AIDS-defining illness even though they did not seek medical care earlier.
References in periodicals archive ?
Results: From 2000 to 2011, 47% of eligible patients were late testers, with lower median CD4 counts (54 vs.
Although US Latinos represent 20% of all new HIV infections, they account for 36% of late testers (1).
Given that some of the factors associated with LT might also be associated with delayed entry into HIV care, the study sample was further restricted to include only those late testers, with timely entry defined as joining the study cohort within 1 year of one's first reported positive HIV test.
Ninety percent (n = 339) of late testers had an AIDS diagnosis within the first 3 months after their first reported positive HIV test, including 49% (n = 184) who were concurrently diagnosed with HIV and AIDS at entry (Figure 2).
Of these late testers, 73% made a total of 7,988 visits to a South Carolina health-care facility during 1997-2005 before their first reported positive HIV test.
Women were less likely than men to be late testers; other demographic and risk characteristics of late testers were similar to those of persons reported to HARS who did not have onset of AIDS within 1 year of their HIV diagnoses.
A total of 7,988 health-care visits were recorded for the 1,302 late testers who had previously visited a health-care facility.
Using the date on which AIDS was diagnosed as supplied by state or local reporting systems, they defined participants as early testers (those who had had their first positive HIV test five or more years before the diagnosis of AIDS, or had gone five or more years without a diagnosis of AIDS after their first positive HIV test) or late testers (those who had had their first positive HIV test one year or less before the diagnosis of AIDS).
Late testers were more likely than early testers to be aged 18-29 (odds ratio, 1.
This report summarizes the results of the analysis, which indicate that late testers were more likely than early testers to be black or Hispanic, less educated, and exposed to HIV through heterosexual contact.
Late testers were defined as persons who had their first positive HIV test [less than or equal to]1 year before the diagnosis of AIDS.
Among persons interviewed during May 2000--February 2003, characteristics of early and late testers were compared.