lanthanides


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lan·tha·nides

(lan'thă-nīdz),
Those elements with atomic numbers 57-71 that closely resemble one another chemically and were formerly difficult to separate from one another. they vary in the electrons in the 4f orbital.
Synonym(s): rare earth elements
[lanthanum, first element of the series]

lan·tha·nides

(lan'thă-nīdz)
Those elements with atomic numbers 57-71 that closely resemble one another chemically and were formerly difficult to differentiate.
[lanthanum, first element of the series]
References in periodicals archive ?
In the geochemistry of rare earth elements of the sedimentary processes, the differentiation in behavior and abnormal redistributions of lanthanides within the REE composition are probably impossible without the participation of the oil and gas hydrocarbons determining the redox conditions of the environment, and never pass without the isomorphism of lanthanides.
The systematics of the excitation energies of the low-lying states as a function of neutron number changing from 84 to 100 in the even-even lanthanides Nd/Sm/Gd/Dy isotopes in the mass region 144-166 and the actinide Th/U isotopes in the mass region 224-238 are presented in Figures (1,2).
Although the lanthanides are 'rare earths' some, like neodymium, actually occur more frequently than many more common metals.
Research works regardihg the obtaining of an electrode micro-alloyed with lanthanides for electric arc clading.
In the same samples, TSH and 17-OHP were measured according to the instruction manuals of the dissociation-enhanced lanthanide fluorescence immunoassay (DELFIA[R]) test kits Neonatal 17a-hydroxyprogesterone and Neonatal hTSH (PerkinElmer).
Prof Thorri Gunnlaugsson, an expert in lanthanide chemistry for sensing applications at Trinity College Dublin, said: "This method is fast and more reliable than the bioassay used today.
The emphasis of this announcement is on the ions, complexes, and organometallic compounds of the transition metals known as lanthanides and actinides, post-transition metals, and metalloid elements.
Experiments at low energy, below 8 keV, at the K edges of the early transition metals and the L edges of early lanthanides have been more difficult to perform, because of absorption by the Be windows in the beam line and by the samples themselves.
The last major change to the table was in the 1940s, when Nobel Laureate Glenn Seaborg at the University of California, Berkeley created a separate group for the lanthanides and actinides--the rare earth and radioactive elements.
Despite these efforts, little progress has been reported in the preparation of homoleptic complexes composed of low-valent transition metals and lanthanides and cyanide.