lantern test

lantern test

A near-extinct and unwieldy test for colour blindness using different coloured glass filters; the currently preferred method for testing colour perception is the Ishihara pseudoisochromatic test.

Edridge-Green lantern

An occupational colour vision test that consists of small round and variable sized coloured lights produced by coloured and neutral density filters. See lantern test.
References in periodicals archive ?
Other pseudoisochromatic screening tests and occupational lanterns were produced in different countries, and it became routine to use a pseudoisochromatic test to identify colour deficiency followed by a secondary occupational lantern test to determine colour-naming ability.
7) Three new standards were proposed with the Ishihara test, the Farnsworth D15 (D15) test and an approved lantern test recommended for implementation (see Table 1).
11) The recommended fail criterion for a lantern test is two errors on two runs (sequences) of nine colour pairs in photopic viewing but this can only be applied to the H-W lanterns and the FALANT.
Acceptance of these criteria particularly favours minimal/slight deuteranomalous trichromats that would have failed the lantern test and been rejected.
The panel of expert adjudicators awarded the prize to the "CAM" lantern test and since 2003 this has become very widely used.
Frequently for potential candidates who are likely to face official lantern tests for some occupations seek an opportunity to experience a preliminary lantern test.
Therefore a lantern test is used for certain occupations to assist grading of visual ability and some details are described in the AOP Membership Handbook.
It was interesting to hear comments from a wife who sat beside her husband when he required a lantern test before his application for a flying licence.
Until recently, a failure on the Ishihara plates would have indicated the need for a Holmes Wright Lantern test to assess whether the applicant can recognise the colours used in aviation.
The majority of individuals with a colour vision defect make errors on a lantern test that simulates the red, green and white of maritime signals.
72-75) The X-Chrom filter also does not affect the daltonian's performance on the Farnsworth Lantern test.
Although lantern tests are not used routinely in optometric practice, they are sometimes recommended for the assessment of colour vision for occupational purposes, especially for the railway, aviation and maritime industries.