language disorder


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Related to language disorder: Expressive language disorder

language disorder

a partial or complete disruption in the ability to understand and/or produce the conventional symbols or words that comprise one's native language.

language disorder

Speech pathology Any defect in verbal communication and the ability to use or understand the symbol system for interpersonal communication. See Dyslexia.
References in periodicals archive ?
A parent who has a writing disorder may have a child with an expressive language disorder.
The criterion of limited communicative competence in both languages is often used for determining the presence of a language disorder (American SpeechLanguage-Heating Association, [ASHA], 1985), but arrested language development or language loss may negatively affect the child's performance in the native language so that using this criterion exclusively may result in false positive identifications.
We hypothesize that a combined type of receptive-expressive language disorder will be the most common.
They had all been diagnosed with developmental language disorders when they were younger.
Just three weeks into my speech pathology study exchange in Valparaiso, Chile, I learned of APANTeL, the parent organization that is fighting for equal rights of children with language disorders.
The findings "augment the accepted importance of early intervention for children with language disorders," Dr.
Moreover, a language disorder in bilingual or limited-English-speaking students may manifest itself in the same way as for monolinguals, and sometimes more severely in one or the other language.
BOSTON -- Developmental language disorders can wreak havoc on the social development of children and adolescents.
The new finding provides "a smoking gun for a genetic cause of one kind of language disorder," contends psychologist Steven Pinker of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in a comment published in the same issue of NATURE.
Cross-Linguistic Perspectives on the Syntax and Semantics of Language Disorder
Each chapter in this book/CD-ROM text on acquired language disorder (ALD) presents real-life cases in major aphasic syndromes, right hemisphere disorders, traumatic brain injury, dementia, encephalopathy, and other etiologies affecting the ability to communicate.
Developmental language disorder often surfaces in toddlers: one-third of children will outgrow the problem, one-third will continue to have the problem into school- age, and one-third will progress to more complex problems.
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