lake


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Related to lake: Lake Vostok

lake

 [lāk]
1. to undergo separation of hemoglobin from erythrocytes.
2. a circumscribed collection of fluid in a hollow or depressed cavity; see also lacuna.
lacrimal lake the triangular space at the medial angle of the eye, where the tears collect. See also lacrimal apparatus.

lake

(lāk), [TA]
1. A small collection of fluid. Synonym(s): lacus [TA]
2. To cause blood plasma to become red as a result of the release of hemoglobin from the erythrocytes, such as when the latter are suspended in water.

See also: lacuna.
[A.S. lacu, fr. L. lacus, lake]

lake

(lāk)
1. to undergo separation of hemoglobin from erythrocytes.
2. a circumscribed collection of fluid in a hollow or depressed cavity.

lacrimal lake  the triangular space at the medial angle of the eye, where the tears collect.
marginal lakes  discontinuous venous lacunae, relatively free of villi, near the edge of the placenta, formed by merging of the marginal portions of the intervillous space with the subchorial lake.
subchorial lake  the portion of the placenta, relatively free of villi, just beneath the chorionic plate; at the edge of the placenta it becomes continuous with irregular channels to form the marginal lakes.

lake

(lāk)
1. [TA] A small collection of fluid.
Synonym(s): lacus.
2. To cause blood plasma to turn red as a result of the release of hemoglobin from erythrocytes.
See also: lacuna
[A.S. lacu, fr. L. lacus, lake]

lake

(lāk)
1. Small collection of fluid.
2. To cause blood plasma to become red as a result of hemoglobin release from erythrocytes.
[A.S. lacu, fr. L. lacus, lake]

lake

1. to undergo separation of hemoglobin from erythrocytes.
2. a lacuna; a circumscribed collection of fluid in a hollow or depressed cavity.

lacrimal lake
see lacrimal lake.
References in classic literature ?
Away off on the opposite shore of the lake we could see some villages, and now for the first time we could observe the real difference between their proportions and those of the giant mountains at whose feet they slept.
In the night he went to the lake, cast his nets, and on drawing them in found four fish, which were like the others, each of a different colour.
When they arrived there they went at once to the Lake, and this time the lions did not stir, nor did the springs flow, and neither did the Lake speak.
Quite different from Lake Asphaltite, whose depression is twelve hundred feet below the sea, it contains considerable salt, and one quarter of the weight of its water is solid matter, its specific weight being 1,170, and, after being distilled, 1,000.
They turned their heads, and there was the Cynic, with his prodigious spectacles set carefully on his nose, staring now at the lake, now at the rocks, now at the distant masses of vapor, now right at the Great Carbuncle itself, yet seemingly as unconscious of its light as if all the scattered clouds were condensed about his person.
Captain Sublette, in one of his early expeditions across the mountains, is said to have sent four men in a skin canoe, to explore the lake, who professed to have navigated all round it; but to have suffered excessively from thirst, the water of the lake being extremely salt, and there being no fresh streams running into it.
This gorge was dammed and the waters of the lake collected: the Susquehanna was converted into a rill.
Lawrence near Montreal, and by other rivers and portages, to Lake Nipising, Lake Huron, Lake Superior, and thence, by several chains of great and small lakes, to Lake Winnipeg, Lake Athabasca, and the Great Slave Lake.
Well I know, now, this dim lake of Auber -- This misty mid region of Weir: -- Well I know, now, this dank tarn of Auber -- This ghoul-haunted woodland of Weir.
On the other side of the lake stood a fine illuminated castle, from which came the merry music of horns and trumpets.
They look so snug and so homelike, and at eventide when every thing seems to slumber, and the music of the vesper bells comes stealing over the water, one almost believes that nowhere else than on the lake of Como can there be found such a paradise of tranquil repose.
1851, with Overweg, to visit the kingdom of Adamaoua, to the south of the lake, and from there he pushed on as far as the town of Yola, a little below nine degrees north latitude.