laetrile


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Related to laetrile: Vitamin B17

laetrile

 [la´ĕ-tril]
amygdalin derived from crushed pits of certain fruits.

la·e·trile

(lā'ĕ-tril),
An allegedly antineoplastic drug consisting chiefly of amygdalin derived from apricot pits; no benficial effect has been proven.

Laetrile

/La·e·trile/ (la´ĕ-tril) trademark for l -mandelonitrile-β-glucuronic acid, a semisynthetic derivative of amygdalin; it is alleged to have antineoplastic properties. Cf. laetrile.

laetrile

/la·e·trile/ amygdalin (l -mandelonitrile-β-gentiobioside) derived from crushed pits of certain fruits, usually apricots, and alleged to have antineoplastic properties. Cf. Laetrile.

laetrile

(lā′ĭ-trĭl′, -trəl)
n.
A substance derived from amygdalin that has been promoted by some individuals as a treatment for cancer, although scientific studies have found no evidence of its effectiveness.

Laetrile

[lā′ətril]
a substance composed primarily of amygdalin, a cyanogenic glycoside derived from apricot pits. Laetrile has been offered as a cancer medication despite clinical studies by the National Cancer Institute that failed to show benefits from its use. It is claimed that amygdalin is hydrolyzed by enzymes in cancer cells to produce benzaldehyde and hydrogen cyanide, which kill the cancer cells. It is not FDA approved. Also called vitamin B 17.

laetrile

Amygdalin Quackery A cyanide-rich bitter almond, apricot or peach pit extract, claimed to be effective in treating cancer. See Manner cocktail, Tijuana, Unproven methods of cancer management.

la·e·trile

(lā'ĕ-tril)
An allegedly antineoplastic drug consisting chiefly of amygdalin derived from apricot pits; no beneficial effect ever has been proven.

laetrile

A substance, amygdalin, derived from the seeds of bitter almonds, apricots and other fruit, that has been claimed to be effective in treating cancer. It is said to yield a cyanide-containing compound, mandelonitrile, under the action of enzymes said to be more plentiful in cancers than in normal tissue. There is no medically acceptable evidence that laetrile has any value in the treatment of cancer.

laetrile (lāˑ··tril),

n anticancer treatment used for centuries that became popular in the 1950s. Ernest Krebs, Jr. coined the trade name
Laetrile. Controlled clinical studies have failed to confirm the drug's efficacy. See also amygdalin.
References in periodicals archive ?
One of Moss's first interviews was with a respected researcher named Kanematsu Sugiura, DSc, who in 1972 was asked to test laetrile in spontaneously occurring tumors in mice.
Paul Davignon, chief of the PRB (and coauthor of the laetrile paper), wrote that this Mexican laetrile was "chemically subpotent, mislabeled and of poor manufacturing quality.
He insisted that populations that consume relatively large amounts of laetrile have very little, if any, cancer, while those who had given up the habit of eating laetrile-rich foods suffered from devastating levels of the disease.
Arguably, their problems started with the announcement of negative clinical results with laetrile at the Mayo Clinic (Moertel 1982).
She was also responsible for the production of two historical films, Nature's Answer to Cancer, the story of laetrile, and the National Health Federation documentary Action for Survival, starring Ralph Nader and Adelle Davis and featuring "freedom of choice" issues.
A study from John Morrone including 10 cases of inoperable cancer with metastases indicated clinical benefit from laetrile (specified as 1-mandelonitrile-beta-glucuronide), using dosages of 1 g i.
Meanwhile, a federal lawsuit filed by cancer patients seeking to enjoin the FDA from interfering with the interstate shipment and sale of Laetrile was weaving its way through the federal judicial system.
Laetrile was a cancer treatment that came from the kernel of an apricot pit, and many of the letter writers suggested this could be a potent weapon in the war against cancer.
It has been claimed - quite wrongly - that laetrile can help to cure cancer.
uk IT'S A FACT | The seed inside a peach contains an almond-like nut which holds a potent anti-cancer medicine called laetrile.
For example, in the 1970s a drug called laetrile got tremendous attention from cancer patients (and the media).
The drug involved in that case was Laetrile, (79) which had a long history of failure.