lactic acid


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lactic

 [lak´tik]
pertaining to milk.
lactic acid a metabolic intermediate involved in many biochemical processes; it is the end product of glycolysis, which provides energy anaerobically in skeletal muscle during heavy exercise, and it can be oxidized aerobically in the heart for energy production or can be converted back to glucose (gluconeogenesis) in the liver. Moderate elevations of blood lactate occur during heavy exercise; severe elevations (lactic acidosis) can occur in diabetes mellitus and in genetic deficiencies of enzymes involved in gluconeogenesis. Lactate is also the end product of fermentation in several bacterial species. The sodium salt of racemic or inactive lactic acid (sodium lactate) is used as an electrolyte and fluid replenisher.

lac·tic ac·id

(lak'tik as'id),
A normal intermediate in the fermentation (oxidation, metabolism) of sugar. In pure form, a syrupy, odorless, and colorless liquid obtained by the action of the lactic acid bacillus on milk or milk sugar; in concentrated form, a caustic used internally to prevent gastrointestinal fermentation. A culture of the bacillus, or milk containing it, is usually given in place of the acid. l-Lactic acid is also known as sarcolactic acid.

lactic acid

/lac·tic ac·id/ (lak´tik) CH3CHOHCOOH, a compound formed in the body in anaerobic metabolism of carbohydrate and also produced by bacterial action in milk. The sodium salt of racemic or inactive lactic acid (sodium lactate) is used as an electrolyte and fluid replenisher.

lactic acid

n.
A syrupy, water-soluble liquid, C3H6O3, produced by anaerobic glucose metabolism in muscles, by certain bacteria, and by synthetic methods. Lactic acid is present in fermented foods such as yogurt and sauerkraut and is used in foods and beverages as a flavoring and preservative, in dyeing and textile printing, and in pharmaceuticals.

lactic acid

a three-carbon organic acid produced by anaerobic respiration. L-Lactic acid in muscle and blood is a product of glucose and glycogen metabolism; D-lactic acid is produced by the fermentation of dextrose by a species of micrococcus; a mixture of both D- and L-isomers is found in the stomach, in sour milk, and in certain foods prepared by bacterial fermentation, such as sauerkraut. Also called alpha-hydroxypropionic acid or 2-hydroxypropanoic acid. See also glycolysis.

lac·tic ac·id

(lak'tik as'id)
A normal intermediate in glycosis.

lactic acid

An acid formed when muscles are strongly contracted for long periods. Also formed from carbohydrates in the vagina by the action of DODERLEIN'S BACILLUS. Lactic acid is an ingredient in a range of drug formulations.

lactic acid

an organic acid (CH3 CH(OH)COOH) produced from pyruvic acid as a result of ANAEROBIC RESPIRATION in microorganisms (see LACTOSE and in the active muscles of animals (see OXYGEN DEBT), the hydrogenation of pyruvate being catalysed by lactic dehydrogenase (LDH). In animals the acid can be oxidized back to pyruvate (using LDH again) when sufficient oxygen is available, most of the conversion taking place in the liver.

lactic acid

three-carbon molecule formed by reduction of pyruvic acid in last step of anaerobic glycolysis; dissociates to form lactate and hydrogen ions (H+). See also monocarboxylate transporters.

lac·tic ac·id

(lak'tik as'id)
Normal intermediate in the fermentation of sugar. In concentrated form, a caustic used internally to prevent gastrointestinal fermentation.

lactic

pertaining to milk.

lactic acid
a compound formed in the body in metabolism of carbohydrate, by fermentation of carbohydrates in the rumen and by bacterial action on milk. The sodium salt of racemic or inactive lactic (sodium lactate) acid is used as an electrolyte and fluid replenisher.
lactic acid cycle
the metabolic system by which lactic acid produced by glycolysis in muscles is converted in the liver to glucose. Called also the Cori cycle.
lactic acid indigestion
lactic acidemia
lactacidemia.
lactic acidosis
the state in ruminants in which there is an excess of lactic acid and lactate in the body, due usually to unadapted grain feeding and carbohydrate engorgement.
ruminal lactic acid
the level is high in carbohydrate engorgement.
References in periodicals archive ?
Buffering capacity was determined by the hydrochloric acid-sodium hydroxide method of Playne and McDonald (1966), while the volatile fatty acids, ammonia-N, and lactic acid were determined as a method of Shao et al.
The contents of lactic acid and NH3-N were analyzed according to the method of Barker and Summerson (1941) and Chaney and Marbach (1962).
The organic acids such as lactic acid (HPLC), and acetic acid, butyric acid (Gas chromatography; GC-450, Varian Co.
Reactions occurring between calcined magnesite and lactic acid can be written as follows:
Lactic acid concentration was determined according to the method developed by Taylor [15].
In China, the major upstream raw material of lactic acid is corn starch, and the downstream includes food and beverage, medicine, chemical engineering, cosmetics and electronics industry.
Some species of Lactobacilli are known to be main sources of lactic acid and hydrogen peroxide in vagina, and help in reducing the risk of colonisation by pathogens.
Lactic acid bacteria isolation and 16S rDNA preparation: From the TMR mixture and triplicate silages prepared in Exp.
Lactic acid bacteria as a cell factory: rerouting of carbon metabolism in L.
The growth of lactic acid bacteria was not observed by the scientists until the seventh day on hot dogs treated with 1.
Demand for lactic acid is high in the food, pharmaceutical, textile, and chemical feedstock industries where it is used for production of lactate esters, propylene glycol, 2,3-pentanedione, and propanoic acid.
It's the lactic acid that makes your which builds up in them while you're weight training.