lacrimal


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Related to lacrimal: lacrimal apparatus, lacrimal duct, lacrimal sac, Lacrimal fossa, lacrimal nerve

lacrimal

 [lak´rĭ-mal]
pertaining to tears.
lacrimal apparatus a group of organs concerned with the production and drainage of tears; it is a protective device that helps keep the eye moist and free of dust and other irritating particles. The lacrimal gland, which secretes tears, lies over the upper, outer corner of the eye; its excretory ducts branch downward toward the eyeball. A constant stream of tears washes down over the front of the eye and is drained off through two small openings located in the inner corner of the eye. Through these openings the tears pass into the lacrimal canaliculus, then through the lacrimal sac into the nasolacrimal duct and finally into the nasal cavity.
The lacrimal apparatus. From Jarvis, 1996.

lac·ri·mal

(lak'ri-măl),
Relating to tears, their secretion, the secretory glands, and the drainage apparatus.
Synonym(s): lachrymal
[L. lacrima, a tear]

lacrimal

/lac·ri·mal/ (lak´rĭ-mal) pertaining to the tears.

lacrimal

or

lachrymal

(lăk′rə-məl)
adj.
1. Of or relating to tears.
2. Of, relating to, or constituting the glands that produce tears.

lacrimal

[lak′riməl]
Etymology: L, lacrima, tear
pertaining to tears. Also spelled lachrymal.

lac·ri·mal

, lachrymal (lak'ri-măl)
Relating to the tears, their secretion, the secretory glands, and the drainage apparatus.
[L. lacrima, a tear]

lacrimal

Pertaining to the tears, to their production and to their disposal. Note that the spelling ‘lachrymal’ has neither logical nor etymological justification. The term comes from Latin lacrima , a tear.

lacrimal

Relating to tears.

lacrimal

Relating to tears.

lacrimal

pertaining to tears.

lacrimal apparatus
a group of organs concerned with the production and drainage of tears; it is a nutritive and protective device that helps keep the eye moist and free of dust and other irritating particles. Includes lacrimal gland, accessory lacrimal glands, third eyelid glands and the nasolacrimal duct.
Enlarge picture
Nasolacrimal apparatus in the dog.By permission from McCurnin D, Poffenbarger EM, Small Animal Physical Diagnosis and Clinical Procedures, Saunders, 1991
lacrimal canaliculus
the lacrimal duct within the eyelid.
lacrimal caruncle
the rounded, often pigmented swelling at the medial canthus of the eye.
lacrimal cyst
congenital displacement of lacrimal tissue results in subconjunctival cysts.
lacrimal drainage system
the structures concerned with tear collection; includes lacrimal lake, puncta, canaliculi, sac and nasolacrimal duct.
lacrimal duct
there are two of these minute ducts draining tears from the conjunctiva, via the lacrimal puncta, into the lacrimal sac. Called also lacrimal canaliculus.
lacrimal duct irrigator
a 20 gauge, blunt-pointed, straight or curved cannula with a needle attachment so that it can be attached directly to a syringe nozzle.
lacrimal fossa
fossa in the medial wall of the orbital rim which houses the lacrimal sac.
lacrimal gland
contained in a pad of fat in the dorsolateral part of the orbital cavity and drains into the conjunctival sac via many excretory ducts. The secretion is largely watery tears, but in the pig is mucus. May develop adenitis.
lacrimal gland anomalies
failure of patency of the duct, supernumerary opening of the duct and ductal ectasia recorded.
lacrimal gland atrophy
part of the syndrome of keratoconjunctivitis sicca.
imperforate lacrimal puncta
see imperforate punctum.
lacrimal lake
the recess between the lids at the nasal commissure of the eye where the tears collect.
lacrimal pump
contraction of the orbiculari oculi muscle creates pressure on the lacrimal sac which causes tears to drain from the lacrimal lake.
lacrimal punctum
there is one on each eyelid close to the medial canthus. Each drains tears from the conjunctival sac into the lacrimal duct in the same eyelid. The tears then pass to the lacrimal sac and into the nasolacrimal duct. See also punctum.
lacrimal reflex
tear production caused by irritation of the cornea and conjunctiva.
lacrimal sac
the distended proximal end of the nasolacrimal duct into which the lacrimal ducts empty.
lacrimal sinus
an excavation of the lacrimal bone which communicates with the maxillary sinus in some species.
lacrimal system
see lacrimal apparatus (above).
References in periodicals archive ?
The most obvious and most natural way to relieve dry eye symptoms is to increase the rate of tear production in the lacrimal glands.
Bilateral or unilateral simultaneous swelling of lacrimal, parotid and salivary glands (previously known as Miculicz disease) and chronic sclerosing sialadenitis (known as Kuttner tumor in the past) were previously known as subtypes of SS.
There is no gland of the nictitating membrane proper; however, a lacrimal gland is present inferotemporal to the globe of the eye, and a Harderian gland sits adjacent to the posterior sclera, near the base of the nictitans but not part of it.
Neural regulation of lacrimal gland secretory processes: Relevance in dry eye diseases.
The histologic features of nasolabial cysts show striking similarity to the physiologically encountered epithelia in the lacrimal drainage system, specifically the lacrimal canaliculi and sac and the nasolacrimal duct that drain tear fluid from the eye to the inferior meatus of the nose (Figure 1).
We hypothesize that the bioactive compounds could increase the expression of AQP-5 and restore the distribution of AQP-5 in lacrimal glands and corneal epithelia by inhibiting the release of cytokines (1L-1, IL-6, and TNF-[alpha]) mediated by activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways and production of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), ultimately leading to increased saliva and tear secretion.
Reported lacrimal apparatus malformations have included nasolacrimal duct obstruction and hypoplasia or aplasia of the lacrimal puncta.
Ophthalmology deals with the diseases and surgery of the visual pathways, including the eye, brain and areas surrounding the eye, such as the lacrimal system and eyelids.
When we cry, tears come from the lacrimal (LACK-ri-mal) glands, located behind your upper eyelids.
The aqueous component is a watery layer that is produced by the lacrimal glands.
2) On the other hand, much of the drug flows to the nasal cavity and the oral cavity through the lacrimal passage.