labyrinthine fistula


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labyrinthine fistula

a fistula between a fluid-filled compartment of the inner ear and another fluid-filled compartment in the inner ear (internal) or a space external to the inner ear as the middle ear or mastoid air cells or subarachnoid space (external); it may result in auditory and vestibular disturbances, depending on its location. See: perilymphatic fistula.

lab·y·rin·thine fis·tu·la

(lab'i-rin'thēn fis'chū-lă)
A fistula between a fluid-filled compartment of the inner ear and another fluid-filled compartment in the inner ear (internal) or a space external to the inner ear as the middle ear or mastoid air cells or subarachnoid space (external); it may result in auditory and vestibular disturbances, depending on its location.
References in periodicals archive ?
1) Surgical treatment is recommended to prevent complications of further tympanic/mastoid bone erosion, such as facial nerve injury, ossicular erosion, and labyrinthine fistula.
They discuss anatomical issues that arise, such as labyrinthine fistula and facial nerve dehiscence; controversies in management like the canal wall up versus down debate, facial nerve monitoring, endoscopes, and the value and timing of second-stage surgery; congenital cholesteatoma; recidivism; and complications of otitis media and cholesteatoma surgery.
Two fistulae were discovered, one in the horizontal semicircular canal and one in the superior semicircular canal, and both were filled with granulation tissue (as a result, labyrinthine fistula was added to the list of complications).
As acquired cholesteatomas enlarge, complications can occur, including ossicular erosion, facial nerve canal invasion, tegmen disruption, sinus plate disruption, super-infection, and the development of labyrinthine fistula.
Silent otitis media generally occurs with complications or sequelae, including meningitis (the most common complication), vague ear pain and headache, a feeling of fullness, conductive or sensorineural hearing loss, anxiety, acute attacks of otitis media, labyrinthine fistula, endolymphatic hydrops, etc.
A labyrinthine fistula in which cholesteatoma is unresectable does not reflexively imply that a radical procedure is needed.
Other CT findings include: erosions of scuta, destruction and displacement of the ossicular chain, labyrinthine fistulas, facial canal erosions, tegmen tympani dehiscence, and destruction of the mastoid.
Detection of labyrinthine fistulas in human temporal bone by virtual endoscopy and density threshold variation on computed tomographic scan.