Klebsiella


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Klebsiella

 [kleb″se-al´ah]
a genus of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic rod-shaped bacteria that are widely distributed in nature and commonly found in the intestinal tract. They are a frequent cause of nosocomial urinary and pulmonary infections and wound infections. Species include K. pneumo´niae (also called K. friedlän´deri), the etiologic agent of Friedländer's pneumonia; K. pneumo´niae ozae´nae, which occurs in ozena and other respiratory diseases; and K. rhinosclero´matis, a species isolated from patients with rhinoscleroma.

Klebsiella

(kleb'sē-el'ă),
A genus of aerobic, facultatively anaerobic, nonmotile, non-spore-forming bacteria (family Enterobacteriaceae) containing gram-negative, encapsulated rods that occur singly, in pairs, or in short chains. These organisms produce acetylmethylcarbinol and lysine decarboxylase or ornithine decarboxylase. They do not usually liquefy gelatin. Citrate and glucose are ordinarily used as sole carbon sources. These organisms may or may not be pathogenic. They occur in the respiratory, intestinal, and urogenital tracts of humans as well as in soil, water, and grain. The type species is Klebsiella pneumoniae.
[E. Klebs]

Klebsiella

/Kleb·si·el·la/ (kleb″se-el´ah) a genus of gram-negative bacteria (family Enterobacteriaceae); K. pneumo´niae is the etiologic agent of Friedländer's pneumonia and other respiratory infections.

klebsiella

(klĕb′zē-ĕl′ə)
n.
A nonmotile, gram-negative, rod-shaped bacterium of the genus Klebsiella, such as K. pneumoniae, that causes pneumonia and other infections usually in patients with diminished immunity, such as diabetics and alcoholics.

Klebsiella

[kleb′zē·el′ə]
Etymology: Theodore A.E. Klebs, German bacteriologist, 1834-1913
a genus of diplococcal bacteria that appear as small, plump rods with rounded ends. Several respiratory diseases, including bronchitis, sinusitis, and some forms of pneumonia, are caused by infection by species of Klebsiella.

Kleb·si·el·la

(kleb-sē-el'ă)
A genus of aerobic, facultatively anaerobic, nonmotile, non-spore-forming bacteria (family Enterobacteriaceae) containing gram-negative, encapsulated rods that occur singly, in pairs, or in short chains. These organisms produce acetylmethylcarbinol and lysine decarboxylase or ornithine decarboxylase; they do not usually liquefy gelatin. Citrate and glucose are ordinarily used as sole carbon sources. These organisms may or may not be pathogenic. They occur in the respiratory, intestinal, and urogenital tracts of humans as well as in soil, water, and grain. The type species is K. pneumoniae.
[E. Klebs]

Klebs,

Theodor Albrecht Edwin, German physician, 1834-1913.
Klebsiella - a genus of bacteria (family Enterobacteriaceae) that occurs in the respiratory, intestinal, and urogenital tracts of humans as well as in soil, water, and grain.
Klebs disease
Klebs-Loeffler bacillus - a species that causes diphtheria and produces a powerful exotoxin causing degeneration of various tissues, notably myocardium. Synonym(s): Corynebacterium diphtheriae
Klebsiella oxytoca
Klebsiella pneumoniae - Synonym(s): Friedländer bacillus

Klebsiella

a genus of gram-negative bacteria in the tribe Klebsiellae, family Enterobacteriaceae. Includes K. mobilis (syn. Enterobacter aerogenes).

Klebsiella pneumoniae
carried in the vestibule of the vagina, urethra and clitoridal fossa of the mare as normal flora, but invasion of the cervix and uterus does occur, causing metritis and infertility. An occasional cause of bovine mastitis, hematogenous osteomyelitis originating in pulmonary lesions in cattle, bronchopneumonia in dogs, and pyothorax in horses.

Patient discussion about Klebsiella

Q. What is KLEBSIELLA PNEUMONIAE 0.00

A. Klebsiella is a bacteria that can cause different types of infections such as a urinary tract infection or pneumonia, and is considered a not very common pathogen among patients in the community (meaning outside the hospital). It is known as a pathogen that attacks hospitalized patients at a higher frequency and needds good antibiotic treatment.

Q. Are superbugs contagious through the air? Last week we visited my dad in the hospital, and we noticed that on the next room’s door there was a warning sign. After asking, we were told it was a denoting that the patient inside had a superbug (called klebsiella). On our way out we passed against this patient in the hallway – is it possible that I also carry this superbag? Is it dangerous?

A. Usually these bacteria are transmitted from person to person through direct contact, and less through the air. Moreover, these germs are dangerous in ill and debilitated patients, and not in normal healthy individuals.

More discussions about Klebsiella
References in periodicals archive ?
Signs and symptoms of Klebsiella include fevers and chills, flu-like symptoms, cough which may produce mucus that is yellow or green or bloody and breathing issues.
Practical methods using Boronic acid compounds for identification of class C beta-lactamase producing Klebsiella pneumoniae and Escherichia coli.
Here we report a case of a new variant of Klebsiella pneumoniae (hypervirulent Klebsiella pneumoniae), coming in lime light for its virulent nature and association with healthy individuals, highlighting the fact that virulent infections can initiate from the community.
Null hypothesis was rejected if a type of Klebsiella was included in the model as an independent factor.
Genomic analysis of diversity, population structure, virulence, and antimicrobial resistance in Klebsiella pneumoniae, an urgent threat to public health.
coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae cause infections which are becoming difficult to treat due to high resistance.
The vaborbactam component of Vabomere is a non-suicidal beta-lactamase inhibitor that protects meropenem from degradation by certain serine beta-lactamases such as Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase.
The aim of this study is the early detection of ESBLs and Amp C production in Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae in neonates in our set up and to formulate antibiotic policy according to our sensitivity patterns.
aureus accounting for 17% and Klebsiella 11% of the urinary pathogens It is also postulated in established data that sexually active females are more prone to develop UTI which is again endorsed by our observation which shows 160 subjects of the total sample(n#184) obtained were married and sexually active.
Mazzariol A, Bosnjak Z, Ballarini P, Budimir A, Bedenic B, Kalenic S, Cornaglia G NDM-1 producing Klebsiella pneumoniae, Croatia.
Klebsiella pneumoniae is a pathogenic bacteria, Gram negative and capsulated [6].
El diagnostico de laboratorio puede ser dificil pues las especies de Klebsiella son indistinguibles por los metodos convencionales disponibles y no hay estandarizacion en las pruebas de extension recomendadas.