fox

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Fox

(foks),
George H., U.S. dermatologist, 1846-1937. See: Fox-Fordyce disease.

Fox

(foks),
Lewis, 20th-century U.S. periodontist. See: Goldman-Fox knives.

fox

a member of the same family as dogs, wolves and jackals, the family Canidae, but has characteristic long body and short legs, pointed snout, big, erect ears, oval pupils and long bushy tail. The type species is the Old World red fox (Vulpes vulpes). See also kit, fennec.

arctic fox
a farmed blue or white fox. Called also Alopex lagopus.
fox encephalitis
see infectious canine hepatitis.
gray fox
gray to black, omnivorous wild fox. Called also Urocyon cinereoargenteus.
kit fox
small, yellow-brown fox similar to the red fox. Called also Vulpes velox, V. inacrotis.
Old World red fox
see red fox (below).
fox rabies
the fox is an important reservoir host for rabies, particularly in eastern and western Europe where it is endemic.
red fox
the common, sandy to red brown fox with black legs and backs of ears, white underparts, sharp muzzle, large erect ears. Mostly nocturnal, lives in burrows. Called also Vulpes vulpes, Old World red fox.
silver fox
a farmed fox with a lustrous black coat with white tips along the back; a variant of the red fox (see above).
South American fox
a group of specialized wild dogs, not true foxes, of South America. Includes crab-eating fox and maned wolf.
References in periodicals archive ?
Eighty-four scats failed mtDNA species identification and eight contained DNA from both coyotes and kit foxes; of these, classification trees assigned 59 as coyote and 32 as kit fox based on diameter and length measurements.
In addition to these direct observations, we obtained photographic evidence of both antagonistic and nonantagonistic behaviors between the San Joaquin kit fox and the American badger within another private conservation inholding in the northern portion of the Carrizo Plain, approximately 20 and 44 km northwest of the locations where the interactions described above occurred.
During January 1978, an extensive wildlife survey in the Whitehorse Basin of Harney and Malheur counties resulted in observations of only 3 Kit Foxes; surveyors noted that each Kit Fox was unexpectedly found in sand dune systems, and sightings seemed to have become increasingly rare (ODFW, unpubl, data).
The northern range of the kit fox also occurs in ideal Golden Eagle habitat.
The San Joaquin kit fox has survived as an urbanite in large part because of its adaptability.
Other topographic features, such as the Colorado River, which separates the Arizona populations from those in California, Nevada, and Utah, and the Sierra Nevada Mountains of California, which isolate the San Joaquin kit fox population, may act as barriers to dispersal for small canids, although they apparently have not interrupted gene flow among coyote populations (Lehman and Wayne 1991).
The agreement protects and expands foraging habitat for the California condor, safeguards other threatened or endangered species such as the San Joaquin kit fox, the blunt-nosed leopard lizard and the Tehachapi slender salamander.
Tenders are invited for installation of 27 artificial kit fox dens in city sumps and city landfill buffer area.
Cameras recorded kit fox (Vulpes macrotis), coyote, common raven, and greater roadrunner (Geococcyx californianus) scavenging 10 of the carcasses (Fig.
For example, a home builder purchases San Joaquin kit fox credits from a conservation banker to offset adverse impacts to this endangered species on his project site.
In 2004 and 2005, the CVPCP partnered with the Endangered Species Recovery Program at California State University, Stanislaus, and provided funding towards a three-year project to reintroduce the endangered San Joaquin kit fox (Vulpes macrotis mutica) into vacant or restored lands in the San Joaquin Valley.
macrotis), coyotes have been identified as an important source of mortality and may regulate kit fox populations (Disney and Spiegel, 1992; Rails and White, 1995; White and Garrott, 1999).