kin

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kin

(kĭn)
n.
1.
a. (used with a pl. verb) One's relatives or family: visited my aunt and her kin.
b. A relative or family member: Is she kin of yours?
2. (used with a pl. verb) Organisms that are genetically related to another or others: cauliflower and its kin.
adj.
Related genetically or in the same family.
References in periodicals archive ?
Having thought this, he then left his kinsfolk and went to another place, [where] he encountered a period of famine.
Most were small gatherings of kinsfolk with 15-100 households in the inland area of Luzon (Jocano, 1998; Corpuz, 1997).
Non-agnatic kinsfolk of the totemite gain secondary rights in the land of the patri-clan estate by virtue of their respective and various kin-ties with the totemite; jurally, these ties of kinship yield rights that are mediated rights.
But first he went to Leningrad for a meeting with kinsfolk and old friends, for restoration of scientific communications and, primarily, to complete work on his doctoral thesis, the defence of which took at Leningrad University on March 10th, 1947, i.
It is better translated as "companion" or "friend," whereas [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] (pronounced kaw-robe) means neighbor, or kinsfolk, and comes from the Hebrew word meaning to draw near or approach.
David Fitzpatrick notes that semi-literate Irish correspondence in 19th-century Australia displayed "a distinctive blend of ceremonial and conversational elements, and considerable skill in manipulating their distant kinsfolk through the written word.
But I affirm to our brothers and kinsfolk in Gaza that the Jihad to liberate Palestine and all homelands of Islam mustn't cease, and if the field tightens in one place, it widens in other places, and crusader and Jewish targets are spread all over the world, and it is not for the enemy to impose on us the field, place, time and way in which we fight him.
C*] Do German politicians really believe that it is a compensation of the murdering of our Jewish kinsfolk that Israel can now [C*] do whatever crosses her mind?
Since we learn that they all, especially Maja and Andrej find culture to be a form of spiritual survival, and they find every culture, both past and present, both European and non-European, to be their major foothold, it is not difficult to anticipate that Maja and Andrej recognize each other as spiritual kinsfolk through exchanged codes of culture.
Lau's excellent study looks at the elaborate "paper families" that were created so that Chinese immigrants and their families could bring relatives, friends, kinsfolk, or, in some cases strangers, to the United States, in spite of the country's restrictive immigration policies and practices beginning with the 1875 Page Law.
They could call on their dead kinsfolk and their more remote ancestors to grant clansmen fertility, health and wealth, or on the contrary bring sterility, sickness and poverty on them by withdrawing support.