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King

 [king]
Imogene M. Nursing educator, administrator, researcher, and practitioner. She developed a conceptual framework for nursing at a time when nursing was striving for status as a science and for recognition as a legitimate profession. From her conceptual system, a theory of goal attainment was derived, within which she developed a transaction process model that makes her theory a middle range theory. Her ideas have been tested in research and used by practitioners and educators. Several other theories have been derived from her conceptual system.

King

(king),
Earl J., Canadian biochemist, 1901-1962. See: King unit, King-Armstrong unit.

King, Imogene

(1923-2007), a nursing theorist who introduced her theory of goal attainment in her book, Toward a Theory for Nursing (1971). King defines nursing as a process of human interactions between nurse and patients who communicate to set goals and then agree to meet the goals. King's conceptual framework specifies three interacting systems: personal system, interpersonal system, and social system. She believes that the patient is a personal system within a social system, coexisting through interpersonal processes with other personal systems. The nurse and patient perceive each other and the situation, act and react, interact, and transact. From her major concepts (interaction, perception, communication, transaction, role, stress, growth and development, and time and space), she derives her theory of goal attainment. King describes nursing as a discipline and an applied science, with emphasis on the derivation of nursing knowledge from other disciplines. She suggests that the patient's and nurse's perceptions, judgments, and actions lead to reaction, interaction, and transaction, which she calls the process of nursing.
A regional term for cocaine
References in periodicals archive ?
Moin grounds his decipherment of sacred kingship during sixteenth- through eighteenth-century India and Iran in the rise of Tlmur, especially Ibn KhaldOn's account of astronomical and astrological conjugation (pp.
However, while David was a figure of Christ, and not the incarnate Son, he nevertheless functioned as an instrument by which the LORD mediated the blessings of Christ's eternal kingship to Israel in a time of promise.
Scarf focuses not simply on kingship, but the exact ways in which many presentations of or allusions to kingship as it appears in the fiction, nonfiction, and poetry of the three best-known Inklings is a reflection of a very specific concept about God.
The resulting book presents an excellent and nuanced understanding of early medieval kingship that situates it firmly in an ecclesiastical tradition stretching back to the Roman Empire.
And now Jesus presented him with a new concept of kingship and kingdom--one without worldly power or legions.
Kingship is the political common sense of the entire world for millennia.
Empty Bottles ofGentilism: Kingship and the Divine in Late Antiquity and the Early Middle Ages (to 1050) by Francis Oakley (New Haven and London: Yale University Press, 2010)
When the leadership and the kingship of Jesus are compared to other leaders today and throughout history, it is clear that he has no equal.
Buber continues on the theme of the Kingdom of God in the context of the Song at the Sea, and in the context of kingship over Israel:
The Making of Saint Louis: Kingship, Sanctity, and Crusade in the Later Middle Ages, by M.
argues for one core theme to his OT theology, namely, that of God's kingship (144), claiming it as the "proposed centre [that] accommodates the whole, but the whole [that] is not systematically structured according to it" (144).
Hill's reading of the wave-like arrivals and departures of the human and monstrous characters in Beowulfoffers insight into Danish and Anglo-Saxon expectations of successful kingship.