kinesthesia

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Related to kinesthetically: kinaesthetically

kinesthesia

 [kin″es-the´zhah]
the sense by which position, weight, and movement are perceived. adj., adj kinesthet´ic.

kin·es·the·si·a

(kin'es-thē'zē-ă),
1. The sense perception of movement; the muscular sense.
2. An illusion of moving in space.
Synonym(s): kinesthesis
[G. kinēsis, motion, + aisthēsis, sensation]

kinesthesia

/kin·es·the·sia/ (kin″es-the´zhah)
1. the awareness of position, weight, tension and movement.
2. movement sense.kinesthet´ic

kinesthesia

(kĭn′ĭs-thē′zhə, kī′nĭs-)
n.
The sense that detects bodily position, weight, or movement of the muscles, tendons, and joints.

kin′es·thet′ic (-thĕt′ĭk) adj.
kin′es·thet′i·cal·ly adv.

kinesthesia

[kin′esthē′zhə]
Etymology: Gk, kinesis, motion, aisthesis, feeling
the perception of one's own body parts, weight, and movement. Also spelled kinaesthesia.

proprioception

(1) The internal sense of the relative position of the body’s musculoskeletal units with each other and the effort needed to move them.
(2) Kinaesthetic sense, see there.

kin·es·the·si·a

(kin'es-thē'zē-ă)
1. The sense perception of movement; the muscular sense.
2. An illusion of moving in space.
Synonym(s): kinaesthesia.
[G. kinēsis, motion, + aisthēsis, sensation]

kinesthesia (kiˈ·ns·thēˑ·sē·),

n the sense through which somatic elements such as body position, muscle tension, and weight are perceived.

kin·es·the·si·a

, kinesthesis (kin'es-thē'zē-ă, -sis)
1. Sense perception of movement; muscular sense.
2. Illusion of moving in space.
Synonym(s): kinaesthesia, kinaesthesis.
[G. kinēsis, motion, + aisthēsis, sensation]

kinesthesia

the sense by which position, weight and movement are perceived.
References in periodicals archive ?
By concretizing a metaphor, the protagonist can interact kinesthetically and viscerally with these images, experiencing physically that which was once only an abstract image.
Although many students learn with combined perceptual preferences--auditory and visual or visual, tactual, and auditory--most LD students recall new and difficult academic information efficiently when learning tactually or kinesthetically (Dunn & Dunn, 1993).
Most instrumentalists, especially percussionists, learn to play kinesthetically, also known as "muscle memory.
GameDesk originally developed and released game prototypes working with the leap motion controller that allowed students to use their hand gestures to kinesthetically learning the science concepts.
In order to get students both cognitively and kinesthetically engaged in the development of their understanding of how a simple scatter plot works, we adapted a lesson from College Preparatory Mathematics, Graphing in the First Quadrant (Dieteker & Baldinger, 2011) in which students create a 'human graph.
Trauma is also kinesthetically communicated by the performers' breath, which is variously disrupted, ragged, held and freed.
Without the presence of the mirror that builds up the connection between her own response and that of the model, the child can only kinesthetically feel, or guess at, the visual correspondence.
Such an approach definitely injects fun and amusement into the learning, and students feel relaxed enough to imitate their teacher and express themselves kinesthetically.
Emergence effects allowed 1980s 3D horror sequels like Friday the 13th 3D, Jaws 3-D (1983), and Amityville 3-D (1983) to involve the spectator kinesthetically in their industrial aspirations to become franchises, or extended film series organized around a central concept (such as a psychokiller or a man-eating shark) and a set of formal and narrative conventions, or "rules," that provide structural continuity among installments.
They describe how to mentally represent the body's size, structure, and function and correct or refine these body maps, kinesthetically perceive the body, and be aware of the inner and outer experience.
For the kinesthetically geared student, you might incorporate movement activities created from the rhythm and articulation of a passage.