kinesthetic memory

kinesthetic memory

[kin′esthet′ik]
the recollection of movement, weight, resistance, and position of the body or parts of the body.
References in periodicals archive ?
Musicians rely on their kinesthetic memory to keep playing.
8) We should try to practice pieces requiring more motion or faster reflexes right before going to sleep, and let our kinesthetic memory continue rehearsing the motions for us during sleep.
Recognizing Another Component Of Procedural Memory: Our Kinesthetic Memory
On the other hand, if kinesthetic memory really is an important modality for memorization, is there any way to teach or implement it so that it is more reliable?
Thus Rainer showed her audience how she remade Balanchine's late-modernist ballet--by depending on video documentation instead of a dancer's kinesthetic memory.
I'm never surprised when a dancer picks up a weapon and does well because they understand their bodies and have kinesthetic memory.
That habit becomes his kinesthetic memory and, with the chronic muscle tension, comes the possibility for full-blown pain and injury later in life.
If the student, particularly at the elementary or intermediate level, waits to begin memorizing a piece until after he or she is playing it fluently, it is probably already mostly in the kinesthetic memory, and the student may not make the additional effort to visually and intellectually commit it to memory.
Kinesthetic memory makes memorization faster, increases retention, and enhances memorization capacity.
This strategy may be used to strengthen kinesthetic memory or as a beginning strategy for students who find it difficult to "hear" the piece without moving their fingers.