kinesthesia

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kinesthesia

 [kin″es-the´zhah]
the sense by which position, weight, and movement are perceived. adj., adj kinesthet´ic.

kin·es·the·si·a

(kin'es-thē'zē-ă),
1. The sense perception of movement; the muscular sense.
2. An illusion of moving in space.
Synonym(s): kinesthesis
[G. kinēsis, motion, + aisthēsis, sensation]

kinesthesia

/kin·es·the·sia/ (kin″es-the´zhah)
1. the awareness of position, weight, tension and movement.
2. movement sense.kinesthet´ic

kinesthesia

(kĭn′ĭs-thē′zhə, kī′nĭs-)
n.
The sense that detects bodily position, weight, or movement of the muscles, tendons, and joints.

kin′es·thet′ic (-thĕt′ĭk) adj.
kin′es·thet′i·cal·ly adv.

kinesthesia

[kin′esthē′zhə]
Etymology: Gk, kinesis, motion, aisthesis, feeling
the perception of one's own body parts, weight, and movement. Also spelled kinaesthesia.

proprioception

(1) The internal sense of the relative position of the body’s musculoskeletal units with each other and the effort needed to move them.
(2) Kinaesthetic sense, see there.

kin·es·the·si·a

(kin'es-thē'zē-ă)
1. The sense perception of movement; the muscular sense.
2. An illusion of moving in space.
Synonym(s): kinaesthesia.
[G. kinēsis, motion, + aisthēsis, sensation]

kinesthesia (kiˈ·ns·thēˑ·sē·),

n the sense through which somatic elements such as body position, muscle tension, and weight are perceived.

kin·es·the·si·a

, kinesthesis (kin'es-thē'zē-ă, -sis)
1. Sense perception of movement; muscular sense.
2. Illusion of moving in space.
Synonym(s): kinaesthesia, kinaesthesis.
[G. kinēsis, motion, + aisthēsis, sensation]

kinesthesia

the sense by which position, weight and movement are perceived.
References in periodicals archive ?
In Sheets-Johnstone's view, it is odd that Merleau-Ponty, so often perceived to be the philosopher of the body, almost completely ignores kinaesthesis and seems to assume that it is part of an unexplicatable background for experience (e.
Merleau-Ponty recognizes exactly the match between self-motion and others' movements in his positing of a structure, the 'corporeal schema' (used in imitation, self-recognition and intersubjective awareness), by which older infants match between kinaesthesis and vision.
Indeed, one's experience of kinaesthesis can wax and wane, such that kinaesthesis itself becomes apperceived much of the time, especially when we become engaged in what we are doing, rather than on how we are doing it.