kin selection


Also found in: Dictionary, Wikipedia.

kin selection

n.
A biological theory stating that a gene that causes an organism to exhibit behavior detrimental to its survival will increase in frequency in a population if that behavior benefits the organism's relatives, which will pass the gene on to subsequent generations.

kin selection

a form of selection favouring altruistic (self-sacrificing) behaviour towards relatives. Such a process ensures that even if the chances of an individual's survival are reduced, some of his or here genes will survive in the relative.
References in periodicals archive ?
In Social Conquest, the elder Wilson appeals to his work with Nowak and Tarnita to discredit inclusive fitness theory, reverts to a simple opposition between inclusive fitness theory and group selection, champions group selection, and declares that the difficulties with inclusive fitness theory "render incorrect the oft-repeated claim that group selection is the same as kin selection expressed through inclusive fitness" (171).
The authors conclude that although kin selection is consistent with kindness to close kin and the DLS hypothesis, ethnographic data show how opting for a social life with family and kin over economic success is only consistent with the DLS hypothesis.
Before kin selection was formally proposed in the 1960s, a British ornithologist, V.
KEYWORDS: male androphilia, evolution, sexually antagonistic genes, kin selection, Samoa
The theory of kin selection was initially proposed in1964 by W.
But multilevel selection theory is not an alternative to kin selection theory.
Kin selection theory suggests that the more closely related people are genetically, the more likely they are to cooperate with one another.
The explanatory resources of naturalism include kin selection, the need of human beings to cooperate, and spontaneous feelings of sympathy.
Rogers' piece is the latest twist on a relatively old evolutionary concept called kin selection, which is an evolutionary explanation for why people are willing to help relatives despite the risk of harm or even death.
Less formal though no less central to his argument are evolutionary theory--in particular Hamilton's theory of kin selection (accounting for our fairness instincts)--and the Rawls/Harsanyi concept of the Original Position (OP), from which a rational agent is imagined to choose what kind of society to live in, given that she doesn't know what station in life she will end up occupying.
However, in modern Western society, kinship is no longer the sole basis of community organization, and kin selection is therefore not so relevant as a selective force in reproduction.
Inductively, Fukuyama pulls five propositions from the evidence gathered and collated: Human beings never existed in a pre-social state; natural human sociability is built around two principles, kin selection and reciprocal altruism; human beings have an innate propensity for creating and following norms or rules; human beings have a natural propensity for violence; and, human beings by nature desire not just material resources but also recognition (pp.