kidney failure


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Related to kidney failure: dialysis

failure

 [fāl´yer]
inability to perform or to function properly.
adult failure to thrive a nursing diagnosis accepted by the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association, defined as a progressive functional deterioration of a physical and cognitive nature. The individual's ability to live with multisystem diseases, cope with ensuing problems, and manage his/her care are remarkably diminished.
bone marrow failure failure of the hematopoietic function of the bone marrow; see also bone marrow suppression.
congestive heart failure see congestive heart failure.
heart failure see heart failure.
kidney failure renal failure.
multiple organ failure failure of two or more organ systems in a critically ill patient; see also multiple organ failure.
renal failure see renal failure.
respiratory failure see respiratory failure.
failure to thrive (failure to thrive syndrome) physical and developmental retardation in infants and small children. The syndrome can be seen in children with a physical illness, but the term is most often taken to mean failure to thrive due to psychosocial effects such as maternal deprivation. The syndrome was first noticed when European psychiatrists studied the development of babies who had spent the first five years of their lives in institutions where they were deprived of the emotional warmth of a mother, father, or other primary caregiver.

Characteristics of the failure to thrive syndrome include lack of physical growth (for example, weight and height below the third percentile for age) and below normal achievement in fine and gross motor, social-adaptive, and language skills as assessed by psychometric testing using a tool such as the Denver Developmental Screening Test. Additionally, the child with this syndrome displays withdrawing behavior, avoidance of eye contact, and stiffness or flaccid posture when held. These children often have a history of irritability, feeding problems, and disturbed sleep patterns.

Parents of infants with failure to thrive syndrome typically display feelings of concern and inadequacy. The infant who is feeding poorly and is irritable may elicit a response in the caregiver that reflects tension and frustration. The need for comfort and nurturing by the infant may not be met, and this may lead to a cycle that exacerbates feeding problems.

Intervention encompasses identification of infants and mothers at risk for the syndrome and care of both mother or primary caregiver and infant. The major goals are to encourage the mother to express her feelings without fear of rejection, to model the role of mother and teach her nurturing behaviors, and to promote her self-esteem and confidence. Important nursing goals in the care of the infant include providing optimal nutrition, comfort, and rest; meeting the infant's psychosocial needs; and supplying emotional nurturance and sensory stimulation appropriate to the assessed developmental level.
ventilatory failure respiratory failure.

kidney failure

kidney failure

Any of a number of conditions–eg, diabetic nephropathy, ESRD, lupus nephritis, characterized by ↓ renal function Management Dialysis; success is monitored by URR and Kt/V. See Acute renal failure, Chronic renal failure, End-stage renal disease.

re·nal fail·ure

(rē'năl fāl'yŭr)
Impairment of renal function, either acute or chronic, with retention of urea, creatinine, and other waste products.
Synonym(s): kidney failure.

kidney failure

The stage in kidney disease in which neither organ is capable of excreting body waste products fast enough to prevent their accumulation in the blood. Kidney failure is inevitably fatal unless the affected person is treated by DIALYSIS or has a kidney transplant.

Kidney failure

The inability of the kidney to excrete toxic substances from the body.
Mentioned in: Nephrotic Syndrome

re·nal fail·ure

(rē'năl fāl'yŭr)
Impairment of renal function, either acute or chronic, with retention of urea, creatinine, and other waste products.
Synonym(s): kidney failure.

failure

inability to perform or to function properly.

failure to conceive
said of cows which return to estrus after mating.
kidney failure
see renal failure.
failure of passive transfer
see maternal immunity.
respiratory failure
called also ventilatory failure; see respiratory failure.
failure to thrive
used generally to describe young animals which are not gaining weight or growing; can be due to disease or management problems. In llamas, used to describe a specific syndrome in which the young are normal in early age, but later stop growing. Rickets is one possible cause, but there may be others.
References in periodicals archive ?
Some of the more common conditions caused by kidney failure are fatigue, bone problems, joint problems, itching, and "restless legs.
The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), also part of NIH, is sponsoring a study to find effective ways to prevent high blood pressure and kidney failure in African Americans.
Hereditary diseases can cause cyst formation and kidney failure in children.
There is an increasing incidence and prevalence of patients with kidney failure requiring replacement therapy, he said and added there is an even higher prevalence of patients in earlier stages of Chronic Renal Disease, with adverse outcomes such as kidney failure, cardiovascular disease, and premature death.
The bill would require the Government Accountability Office (GAO) submit a report on ways to improve care management, including progression of kidney disease and treatment of kidney failure in minority populations, who are disproportionally impacted by kidney disease.
But these results affirm the importance of screening donors as carefully as possible so that we can understand an individual's inherent risk of kidney failure and make sure only those with a low inherent risk are cleared for donation.
Kidney failure among children may also be attributed to some other medical conditions, such as nephrosis, particularly the type that does not respond to treatment and may eventually lead to kidney fibrosis.
Kidney failure cases were identified by linkage with the United States Renal Data System; each case was matched to two controls.
She added: "As well as being tragic for the person involved, kidney failure is also expensive to treat and the high level of diabetes-related kidney failure is one of the reasons diabetes costs 10% of the NHS budget.
The charity also expressed concern that not enough is being done once a diabetes sufferer has been diagnosed with high blood pressure, which increases the chance of complications including heart disease, kidney failure and stroke.
In the second session, the PA discussed a report issued by the health committee regarding kidney failure.
A simple blood test might reveal which people with diabetes are most prone to kidney failure, two long-term studies show.