kerosene poisoning

kerosene poisoning

[ker′əsēn]
Etymology: Gk, keros, wax; L, potio, drink
a toxic condition caused by the ingestion of kerosene or the inhalation of its fumes. Symptoms after ingestion include drowsiness, fever, a rapid heartbeat, tremors, and severe pneumonitis if the fluid is aspirated. Vomiting is not induced. See also petroleum distillate poisoning.
References in periodicals archive ?
Clinical and therapeutic aspects of childhood kerosene poisoning in Djibouti.
Kerosene poisoning was noted to be the leading cause of poisoning in the study (39.
Kerosene poisoning was more common in children less than 1 year, and poisoning due to rat poison, others and unknown substances were more common in older children which is statistically significant.
Singh et al studied pattern of pediatric poisoning in a large north Indian tertiary care centre, and observed a significant decline in kerosene poisoning in the decade 1980-89 compared to 1970-79.
Surprisingly, in this era of development and technology, kerosene poisoning cases are reported from industrialised cities.