keloid


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keloid

 [ke´loid]
a sharply elevated, irregularly shaped, progressively enlarging scar, due to excessive collagen formation in the corium during connective tissue repair. It is a benign tumor that usually has its origin in a scar from surgery or a burn or other injury; keloids are generally considered harmless and noncancerous, although they may produce contractures or cosmetic alterations that affect body image. Ordinarily they cause no trouble beyond an occasional itching sensation. Surgical removal is not usually effective because it results in a high rate of recurrence. However, intralesional injection of steroids, cryotherapy, and x-ray therapy often are of substantial help. When x-ray therapy is employed, care must be taken not to destroy the surrounding healthy tissue. adj., adj keloid´al.
Keloid. From Dorland's, 2000.

ke·loid

(kē'loyd),
A nodular, firm, movable, nonencapsulated, often linear mass of hyperplastic scar tissue, tender and frequently painful, consisting of wide irregularly distributed bands of collagen; occurs in the dermis and adjacent subcutaneous tissue, usually after trauma, surgery, a burn, or severe cutaneous disease such as cystic acne, and is more common in blacks.
Synonym(s): cheloid
[G. kēlē, a tumor (or kēlis, a spot), + eidos, appearance]

keloid

/ke·loid/ (ke´loid) a sharply elevated, irregularly shaped, progressively enlarging scar due to excessive collagen formation in the dermis during connective tissue repair.keloid´al

keloid

also

cheloid

(kē′loid′)
n.
A red, raised formation of fibrous scar tissue caused by excessive tissue repair in response to trauma or surgical incision.

ke·loid′al (-loid′l) adj.

keloid

[kē′loid]
Etymology: Gk, kelis, spot + eidos, form
an overgrowth of collagenous scar tissue at the site of a skin injury, particularly a wound or a surgical incision. The new tissue is elevated, rounded, and firm. Young women and African-Americans are particularly susceptible to keloid formation. Types of therapy include solid carbon dioxide, liquid nitrogen, intralesional corticosteroid injections, radiation, silicon gel, and surgery. Treatment may worsen the condition and should be performed only by skilled professionals. Also spelled cheloid. Compare hypertrophic scarring. keloidal, cheloidal, adj.
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Keloids

keloid

Hypertrophic scar Dermatology A thick, irregular and indurated skin scar of adults aged 15-45 that is 6-fold more common in dark-skinned persons and in ♀; keloids occur in Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome and are associated with infections, burns, trauma, insect bites Management Local steroid injections to relieve pruritus or ↓ size of early lesions; post-excisional recurrence is common

ke·loid

(kē'loyd)
A nodular, firm, often linear mass of hyperplastic thickish scar tissue, consisting of irregularly distributed bands of collagen; occurs in the dermis, usually after trauma, surgery, a burn, or severe cutaneous disease.
[G. kēlē, a tumor (or kēlis, a spot), + eidos, appearance]

keloid

(kē′lŏyd) [Gr. kele, tumor, + eidos, form, shape]
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KELOID
An exuberant scar that forms at the site of an injury (or an incision) and spreads beyond the borders of the original lesion. The scar is made up of a swirling mass of collagen fibers and fibroblasts. Grossly it appears to have a shiny surface and a rubbery consistency. The most common locations for keloid formation are on the shoulders, chest, and back. See: illustration

Treatment

The injection of a corticosteroid sometimes helps the lesion regress. Freezing the tissue with liquid nitrogen, applying pressure dressings, treating it with lasers, excising it surgically, or a combination of these treatments may be used, but recurrences are frequent.

acne keloid

A keloid that develops at the site of an acne pustule.
illustration

keloid

An abnormal healing response causing scars that are markedly overgrown, thickened and disfiguring. Keloids are commoner in black people than in white and may follow any injury or surgical incision. Surgical removal of keloids is followed by even more extensive keloid formation but they can be helped by injection of corticosteroid drugs. Untreated keloids eventually flatten.

Keloid

An unusual or abnormal growth of scar tissue, as in the third stage of granuloma inguinale.
Mentioned in: Granuloma Inguinale

keloid

exuberant hypertrophic scarring, due to genetic trait, especially in African races

ke·loid

(kē'loyd)
A nodular, firm, often linear mass of hyperplastic thickish scar tissue, consisting of irregularly distributed bands of collagen; occurs in the dermis.
[G. kēlē, a tumor (or kēlis, a spot), + eidos, appearance]

keloid (kē´loid),

n a dense, proliferative growth on the skin (hypertrophy of scar tissue) that appears to be an abnormal reaction to trauma, especially burns. Keloids tend to recur after excision and occur more frequently in blacks than in whites.
References in periodicals archive ?
One way of looking at a tattoo is that it's ink under the skin and that alone makes it a risk in getting blood-borne diseases like HIV and hepatitis, skin infections, and of course, keloids.
Summing up, the techniques of rabbit ear keloid models in vogue are: 1) Circular excision of full thickness ventral skin of rabbit ear; 2) Circular excision of full thickness ventral skin plus ventral perichondrium of rabbit ear; 3) Circular excision of full thickness ventral skin plus ventral perichondrium, and nicking of cartilage of rabbit ear.
All selected patients were clinically assessed and the dimensions of the keloid [length, breath and height] were measured from skin surface by calliper.
sup][34] The absence in keloid histological confirmation might be explained by the near-zero rate of malignancies or dysplasias.
Out of eight rabbits, best Keloid was created by technique (g) where injection of TGFB1 was given, followed by ventral skin, ventral perichondrium, cartilage, and dorsal perichondrium punch excision, leaving behind only dorsal skin.
Background: Skin tape and silicone gel are two common over-the-counter preparations used to enhance the cosmesis of keloids and hypertrophic scars of posttrauma wounds.
The histopathology was suggestive of a keloid and no other abnormalities were found upon analysis.
For their part AROSEMENA & AROSEMENA (2007), describe the keloid scar as having a tumoral aspect.
Designed for the treatment and prevention of both hypertrophic and keloid scars, the sheets were once available only through hospitals, burn centers and plastic surgeons offices.
When she had reached the age of 36 years, she required reoperation for massive keloid scarring, after which she underwent a second course of postoperative radiation to the right side of her face and neck.