keloid


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keloid

 [ke´loid]
a sharply elevated, irregularly shaped, progressively enlarging scar, due to excessive collagen formation in the corium during connective tissue repair. It is a benign tumor that usually has its origin in a scar from surgery or a burn or other injury; keloids are generally considered harmless and noncancerous, although they may produce contractures or cosmetic alterations that affect body image. Ordinarily they cause no trouble beyond an occasional itching sensation. Surgical removal is not usually effective because it results in a high rate of recurrence. However, intralesional injection of steroids, cryotherapy, and x-ray therapy often are of substantial help. When x-ray therapy is employed, care must be taken not to destroy the surrounding healthy tissue. adj., adj keloid´al.
Keloid. From Dorland's, 2000.

ke·loid

(kē'loyd),
A nodular, firm, movable, nonencapsulated, often linear mass of hyperplastic scar tissue, tender and frequently painful, consisting of wide irregularly distributed bands of collagen; occurs in the dermis and adjacent subcutaneous tissue, usually after trauma, surgery, a burn, or severe cutaneous disease such as cystic acne, and is more common in blacks.
Synonym(s): cheloid
[G. kēlē, a tumor (or kēlis, a spot), + eidos, appearance]

keloid

/ke·loid/ (ke´loid) a sharply elevated, irregularly shaped, progressively enlarging scar due to excessive collagen formation in the dermis during connective tissue repair.keloid´al

keloid

also

cheloid

(kē′loid′)
n.
A red, raised formation of fibrous scar tissue caused by excessive tissue repair in response to trauma or surgical incision.

ke·loid′al (-loid′l) adj.

keloid

[kē′loid]
Etymology: Gk, kelis, spot + eidos, form
an overgrowth of collagenous scar tissue at the site of a skin injury, particularly a wound or a surgical incision. The new tissue is elevated, rounded, and firm. Young women and African-Americans are particularly susceptible to keloid formation. Types of therapy include solid carbon dioxide, liquid nitrogen, intralesional corticosteroid injections, radiation, silicon gel, and surgery. Treatment may worsen the condition and should be performed only by skilled professionals. Also spelled cheloid. Compare hypertrophic scarring. keloidal, cheloidal, adj.
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Keloids

keloid

Hypertrophic scar Dermatology A thick, irregular and indurated skin scar of adults aged 15-45 that is 6-fold more common in dark-skinned persons and in ♀; keloids occur in Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome and are associated with infections, burns, trauma, insect bites Management Local steroid injections to relieve pruritus or ↓ size of early lesions; post-excisional recurrence is common

ke·loid

(kē'loyd)
A nodular, firm, often linear mass of hyperplastic thickish scar tissue, consisting of irregularly distributed bands of collagen; occurs in the dermis, usually after trauma, surgery, a burn, or severe cutaneous disease.
[G. kēlē, a tumor (or kēlis, a spot), + eidos, appearance]

keloid

(kē′lŏyd) [Gr. kele, tumor, + eidos, form, shape]
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KELOID
An exuberant scar that forms at the site of an injury (or an incision) and spreads beyond the borders of the original lesion. The scar is made up of a swirling mass of collagen fibers and fibroblasts. Grossly it appears to have a shiny surface and a rubbery consistency. The most common locations for keloid formation are on the shoulders, chest, and back. See: illustration

Treatment

The injection of a corticosteroid sometimes helps the lesion regress. Freezing the tissue with liquid nitrogen, applying pressure dressings, treating it with lasers, excising it surgically, or a combination of these treatments may be used, but recurrences are frequent.

acne keloid

A keloid that develops at the site of an acne pustule.
illustration

keloid

An abnormal healing response causing scars that are markedly overgrown, thickened and disfiguring. Keloids are commoner in black people than in white and may follow any injury or surgical incision. Surgical removal of keloids is followed by even more extensive keloid formation but they can be helped by injection of corticosteroid drugs. Untreated keloids eventually flatten.

Keloid

An unusual or abnormal growth of scar tissue, as in the third stage of granuloma inguinale.
Mentioned in: Granuloma Inguinale

keloid

exuberant hypertrophic scarring, due to genetic trait, especially in African races

ke·loid

(kē'loyd)
A nodular, firm, often linear mass of hyperplastic thickish scar tissue, consisting of irregularly distributed bands of collagen; occurs in the dermis.
[G. kēlē, a tumor (or kēlis, a spot), + eidos, appearance]

keloid (kē´loid),

n a dense, proliferative growth on the skin (hypertrophy of scar tissue) that appears to be an abnormal reaction to trauma, especially burns. Keloids tend to recur after excision and occur more frequently in blacks than in whites.
References in periodicals archive ?
has been using a combination of 5-FU, triamcinolone, and a botulinum neuromodulator for the treatment of hypertrophic and keloid scarring.
Keloids and hypertrophic scars are characterized by uncontrolled cellular proliferation that forms unsightly, raised, reddish lesions on the skin.
When hypertrophic scars and keloids were treated by laser removal and covered with silicone gel sheeting, 12.
4) Furthermore, no matter which form of treatment is instituted, the likelihood of keloid recurrence remains high.
19, 2015 /PRNewswire-iReach/ -- The report " Keloids -- Pipeline Review, H1 2015" provides comprehensive information on the therapeutic development for Keloids, complete with comparative analysis at various stages, therapeutics assessment by drug target, mechanism of action (MoA), route of administration (RoA) and molecule type, along with latest updates, and featured news and press releases.
Macroscopically, keloids are large, prominent scars that extend beyond the margins of the original injury--unlike hypertrophic scars, which are confined to the original wound margins.
Based on these observations, the treatment regimens for the ongoing studies for revised keloids and scars, RXI-109-1401 and 1402 respectively, will be altered to optimize the timing and duration of dosing for RXI-109 in these indications.
The optimal conditions for the prevention of keloid formation and hypertrophic scarring are still unknown, but the placement of a silicone gel sheet over the wound surface and the application of light pressure are known to be advantageous.
Announced the Initiation of a Phase 2 Keloid Study: The Company announced in April 2014 that the first patient in the Company's Phase 2a study (RXI-109-1401) was enrolled for the prevention of keloid recurrence.
Keloids are most prevalent in darker skinned individuals, up to 16% in people of African ancestry, and 50% of all keloid patients have a family history of keloids.
Earlier this year, the Company announced the initiation of a second Phase 2a study (RXI-109-1401) for RXI-109 treatment to prevent recurrence of keloids in patients undergoing keloidectomy (removal of keloid).
April 29, 2014 /PRNewswire/ -- RXi Pharmaceuticals Corporation (NASDAQ: RXII), a biotechnology company focused on discovering, developing and commercializing innovative therapies addressing major unmet medical needs using RNA-targeted technologies, today announced that the first patient has enrolled in their Phase 2a study (RXI-109-1401) with RXI-109 for the prevention of keloid recurrence.