justice


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justice

 [jus´tis]
a principle of bioethics that means giving others what is due to them; it is comprised of a group of norms for the fair distribution of benefits, risks, and costs. The terms fairness, desert, and entitlement have been used by philosophers to explicate the idea of justice, while equitability and appropriateness of treatment are used in interpretations. A situation involving justice is present whenever persons are due to receive benefits or burdens because of their particular circumstances. Justice may be distributive, criminal or punitive, or rectificatory.

jus·tice

(jŭs'tis),
The ethical principle that persons who have similar circumstances and conditions should be treated alike; sometimes known as distributive justice.
[L. justitia, fr. jus, right, law]

justice

Etymology: L, justus, sufficient
1 a principle of fair and equal treatment for all, with due reward and honor.
2 (in research) equitable distribution of benefits and burdens of research.
3 treating people in a nonprejudicial manner.

jus·tice

(jŭs'tis)
1. An ethical principle of fairness or equity, according equal rights to all and basing rewards on merit and punishments on guilt.
2. nursing Ethical principle that individual people and groups with similar circumstances and conditions should be treated alike; fairness with equal distribution of goods and services.
See also: Nursing Interventions Classification
[L. justitia, fr. jus, right, law]

justice,

n principle of medical ethics according to which a person treats another person with fairness in both medical and nonmedical settings.

jus·tice

(jŭs'tis)
1. An ethical principle of fairness or equity, according equal rights to all and basing rewards on merit and punishments on guilt.
2. nursing ethical principle that individual people and groups with similar circumstances and conditions should be treated alike.
[L. justitia, fr. jus, right, law]

justice,

n the constant and perpetual disposition to render every person his or her due. Also, the conformity of one's actions and will to the law.
References in classic literature ?
As the chief justice lingered an instant at the door a trumpet sounded within, and the regiment came clattering forth and galloped down the street.
thought the chief justice, with somewhat of an old Puritan feeling in his breast.
Over the wide front door was a balcony, in which the chief justice had often stood when the governor and high officers of the province showed themselves to the people.
SOCRATES: Then justice or temperance or holiness, or some other part of virtue, as would appear, must accompany the acquisition, and without them the mere acquisition of good will not be virtue.
SOCRATES: Then the acquisition of such goods is no more virtue than the non-acquisition and want of them, but whatever is accompanied by justice or honesty is virtue, and whatever is devoid of justice is vice.
The answer is, that the two blend in one, and are two faces of the same truth; for justice is the order of the State, and the State is the visible embodiment of justice under the conditions of human society.
Thus Stallbaum, who is dissatisfied with the ordinary explanations of the argument of the Republic, imagines himself to have found the true argument "in the representation of human life in a State perfected by justice and governed according to the idea of good.
The justice of the peace is over thirty miles from me.
Good, sir,' says the mercer to him tauntingly, 'are you a justice of peace or a constable?
The case was plain and could not be denied, so the constable was charged with the right thief, and the mercer told me very civilly he was sorry for the mistake, and hoped I would not take it ill; that they had so many things of this nature put upon them every day, that they could not be blamed for being very sharp in doing themselves justice.
Justice Stareleigh's temper bordered on the irritable, and brooked not contradiction.
Serjeant Buzfuz began by saying, that never, in the whole course of his professional experience--never, from the very first moment of his applying himself to the study and practice of the law--had he approached a case with feelings of such deep emotion, or with such a heavy sense of the responsibility imposed upon him--a responsibility, he would say, which he could never have supported, were he not buoyed up and sustained by a conviction so strong, that it amounted to positive certainty that the cause of truth and justice, or, in other words, the cause of his much-injured and most oppressed client, must prevail with the high-minded and intelligent dozen of men whom he now saw in that box before him.