jurisdiction

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jurisdiction

As used in the UK, the place where a body is found. Formally, the jurisdiction of a coroner is founded on
• where a dead body lies within his or her district; 
• where a body otherwise within his or her district is lost or irrecoverable; or
• where a body comes to lie in his or her district by repatriation from abroad.

jurisdiction

The authority and power of courts to hear and render judgments on the parties and subject matter of a case.
References in periodicals archive ?
in the state should be attributed to it for jurisdictional purposes,
new jurisdictional balance on these issues is troubling in light of the
This Cree jurisdictional process discussion was initiated by the Elders as they shared their deep concern for families being torn apart and the impact this had upon the functioning of the community.
A theory of membership composition and jurisdictional requests
Therefore, the government and business association literatures are used in the formation of a research question and hypotheses on how population size dispersion affects approaches to jurisdictional responsibility in collective intergovernmental lobbying.
An early jurisdictional challenge under the DTSA will force the plaintiff to satisfy its burden to show that the alleged secrets relate to interstate commerce, and to do so it may be necessary to identify the alleged secrets.
In recent years, the Supreme Court has paid significant attention to the boundary between jurisdictional and nonjurisdictional rules.
Given that jurisdictional fragmentation cannot be firmly cabined into the "early modern" period, and hence that this is no story about the "early modern" alone, one could well ask what might be at stake in writing the history of European colonialism as a history of jurisdictional fragmentation.
6) It is this clear statement rule that the Court has made the focus of its recent jurisdictional cases.
It focuses upon the operation of jurisdictional fact in planning and environmental cases, and in particular the line of case law that led to the High Court decision in Corporation of the City of Enfield v Development Assessment Commission ('Enfield').
This Article examines the text, structure, history, and early interpretation of the AIA and comes to a novel conclusion: the Act is not jurisdictional in the usual sense, but rather governs the equity jurisdiction of the federal courts.