jugular bulb

bulb of jug·u·lar vein

[TA]
one of two dilated parts of the internal jugular vein, especially evident via contrast radiography (venography): (1) the superior bulb (Heister diverticulum) is a dilation at the beginning of the internal jugular vein in the jugular fossa of the temporal bone (bulbus superior venae jugularis [TA]); (2) the inferior bulb is a dilated portion of the vein just before it reaches the brachiocephalic vein (bulbus inferior venae jugularis [TA]). Synonym(s): jugular bulb
Synonym(s): bulbus venae jugularis [TA]

jugular bulb

(1) Inferior bulb of jugular vein; bulbus inferior venae jugularis [NA6]. 
(2) Superior bulb of jugular vein; bulbus superior venae jugularis [NA6].
References in periodicals archive ?
Then, his right femoral vein was accessed and a 6-F shuttle sheath was positioned into the left jugular bulb.
Computed tomography (CT) of the temporal bone showed evidence of a high jugular bulb abutting the TM and the ossicular chain, with a dehiscent middle ear floor (figure, C).
Type C tumors involve both the jugular bulb and the internal jugular vein (IJV).
1 Reference blood samples were taken from both an arterial cannula placed in the radial artery and a catheter placed in the internal jugular bulb vein, obtained at baseline and after a series of increasingly hypoxic states.
They describe evoked potentials and electroencephalography; radiological techniques; techniques for cerebral blood flow, such as neurosonology, laser Doppler and thermal diffusion flowmetry, jugular bulb oximetry, and near infrared spectroscopy; monitoring techniques for intracranial pressure, brain oxygen, cerebral microdialysis, and brain temperature; and device development, engineering, simulation, telemedicine, robotics, information processing, data acquisition and storage, medical informatics and multimodality monitoring, noninvasive brain monitoring, and future developments.
The following section discusses three monitoring technologies that have been studied and used in the management of neuro patients: noninvasive transcutaneous cerebral oximeters, intravascular jugular bulb venous oxygen saturation catheters, and implanted brain tissue oxygen catheters.
We report a case of a high, lateralized jugular bulb as the cause of conductive hearing loss in an 8-year-old boy.
The purpose of this study was to intraoperatively compare the effects of moderate hyperventilation on the jugular bulb oxygen saturation (SjO [sub]2 ), cerebral oxygen extraction ratio (O [sub]2 ER), mean arterial blood pressure (MAP), and heart rate (HR) in patients with a supratentorial tumor under different anesthetic regimens.
The first decade of Continuous monitoring of jugular bulb oxyhemoglobin saturation: Management strategies, Critical Care Medicine 26(2), 344-351.
These evaluated vascular anomalies and variants were diagnosed on the following previously described criteria [Figure 1]: (1) High jugular bulb, the jugular bulb extended above the inferior border of the round window; [sup][1] (2) dehiscent jugular bulb or dehiscent sigmoid plate, the incomplete thin bone around the jugular bulb or the sigmoid sinus; [sup][4],[10] (3) jugular bulb diverticulum, prominent protrusion or an irregular out-pouching of jugular bulb that was clearly distinguished from a smooth ellipsoidal form; [sup][22] (4) sigmoid sinus diverticulum, a diverticulum entered into the mastoid bone; [sup][9] (5) lateral sinus stenosis, the L/S ratio (L = the largest area of the vein; S = the smallest area of the vein) was >4.
6% of head and neck minors (Greenberg, 2001) and arise from paraganglion cells in the area of the jugular bulb, typically from the superior vagal ganglion.
Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI; figure, B) and computed tomography (CT; figure,C) of the temporal bone showed a mass with its epicenter on the posterior fossa plate, with extensive bony destruction of the semicircular canals, focal erosion into the basal turn of the cochlea, and involvement of the jugular bulb.