jargon

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jar·gon

(jar'gŏn),
Language or terminology peculiar to a specific field, profession, or group.
See also: paraphasia.
[Fr. gibberish]

jargon (jar.)

[jär′gən]
Etymology: Fr, jargonner, to speak indistinctly
1 incoherent speech or gibberish.
2 a terminology used by scientists, artists, or others of a professional subculture that is not understood by the general population.
3 a state in child language acquisition characterized by strings of babbled sounds paired with gestures.
(1) Language peculiar to a group or profession—medical, legal, etc.
(2) A specialized term, phrase, or acronym, that is either created for a particular purpose—e.g., nutmeg liver—or is a new use—e.g., organ transplant for scavenging parts from a ‘dying’ computer—for an extant term

jargon

Sociology A specialized term, phrase, or acronym, that is either created for a particular purpose–eg, nutmeg liver or is a new use–eg, organ transplant for computers–for an extant term; language peculiar to a group or profession, medical, legal, etc. Cf Dialect, Slang.

jar·gon

(jahr'gŏn)
1. Language or terminology peculiar to a specific field, profession, or group.
2. Nonsensical speech due to insult or trauma to the brain.
[Fr. gibberish]

jargon

1. Technical or specialized language used in an inappropriate context to display status or exclusiveness.
2. The formulation of fluent but meaningless chatter by combining unrelated syllables or words. Jargon is sometimes a feature of APHASIA.

jar·gon

(jahr'gŏn)
Language or terminology peculiar to a specific field, profession, or group.
[Fr. gibberish]
References in classic literature ?
I have jotted down the very words of their argument, but now it degenerates into a mere noisy wrangle with much polysyllabic scientific jargon upon each side.
Near Shotwood he came upon five seamen, on their way from Poole to Southampton--rude red-faced men, who shouted at him in a jargon which he could scarce understand, and held out to him a great pot from which they had been drinking--nor would they let him pass until he had dipped pannikin in and taken a mouthful, which set him coughing and choking, with the tears running down his cheeks.
Never had he heard such jargon of scholastic philosophy, such fine-drawn distinctions, such cross-fire of major and minor, proposition, syllogism, attack and refutation.
The law of nature is a jargon of words, which means nothing.
Slowly loosening his grasp as he listens to the incoherent jargon with an attentive frown, he turns to the Lascar and fairly drags him forth upon the floor.
When they had all three amused themselves a little with their victim's infatuation, they dismissed the subject as one which had been sufficiently discussed, and began to talk in a jargon which the child did not understand.
That's just the jargon of the courts," Razumihin put in.