jargon

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jar·gon

(jar'gŏn),
Language or terminology peculiar to a specific field, profession, or group.
See also: paraphasia.
[Fr. gibberish]

jargon (jar.)

[jär′gən]
Etymology: Fr, jargonner, to speak indistinctly
1 incoherent speech or gibberish.
2 a terminology used by scientists, artists, or others of a professional subculture that is not understood by the general population.
3 a state in child language acquisition characterized by strings of babbled sounds paired with gestures.
(1) Language peculiar to a group or profession—medical, legal, etc.
(2) A specialized term, phrase, or acronym, that is either created for a particular purpose—e.g., nutmeg liver—or is a new use—e.g., organ transplant for scavenging parts from a ‘dying’ computer—for an extant term

jargon

Sociology A specialized term, phrase, or acronym, that is either created for a particular purpose–eg, nutmeg liver or is a new use–eg, organ transplant for computers–for an extant term; language peculiar to a group or profession, medical, legal, etc. Cf Dialect, Slang.

jar·gon

(jahr'gŏn)
1. Language or terminology peculiar to a specific field, profession, or group.
2. Nonsensical speech due to insult or trauma to the brain.
[Fr. gibberish]

jargon

1. Technical or specialized language used in an inappropriate context to display status or exclusiveness.
2. The formulation of fluent but meaningless chatter by combining unrelated syllables or words. Jargon is sometimes a feature of APHASIA.

jar·gon

(jahr'gŏn)
Language or terminology peculiar to a specific field, profession, or group.
[Fr. gibberish]
References in periodicals archive ?
This complex history makes jargon a perfect candidate for Garberian analysis.
Although exhaustively argued, Garber's defense of jargon is relatively simple.
But are they jargon in any recognizable, modern sense of the definition?
With the OpenEdge platform we are able extend Progress-based applications to wireless devices in a matter of a few weeks, including design, development and field testing," said Keith Stuessi, vice president and co-founder of Jargon Software.
By leveraging their Progress technology and the wireless expertise of Jargon Software, Kirchner didn't have to spend a lot of time mining for new technology.
Jargon Software is a Minnesota-based Application Partner specializing in Internet and wireless applications for mobile workers and remote offices of manufacturing, distribution, and medical companies.