isotonic drink

isotonic drink

Sports medicine
1. A sports drink used to simply replace fluid and electrolytes lost during prolonged exercise. See Sports drink.
2. A sports drink that replaces water and electrolytes and contains either fructose or glucose polymers allowing slow release of carbohydrates for replenishing reserves of energy consumed while exercising. See Sports drink.
References in periodicals archive ?
Lallana struck approximately half-an-hour after he usually finds himself sitting in the dug-out with an isotonic drink in his hand.
The moveable object transformed into an irresistible force over a half-time isotonic drink and timely rollicking.
As well as meeting supporters, the Welsh players were launching the WRU's new official isotonic drink, PAS Pro ISo.
Council pop, soda water or an isotonic drink are all recommended as is bouillon and maybe a sugary treat.
com)-- Young Coconut Water is one of the nature's most refreshing isotonic drink, consumed worldwide for its nutritious and health benefiting properties.
If you're feeling really rough, try a rehydration treatment sachet or an isotonic drink.
aACAyIf you're doing more than 60 minutes of exercise in one session and will do more later in the day, it's good to use an isotonic drink,' says Derbyshire.
However, Ellery admits they needed more than an isotonic drink and slice of orange at the break to wake them up.
The incentive here is its nature's isotonic drink and as an organic product can be an excellent alternative to sports drinks.
Powerade ION4 is a still isotonic drink that contains sodium, potassium, magnesium and calcium - all minerals lost in sweat.
Today, F&N owns an array of beer, dairy and soft drink brands that include household names such as Tiger beer, isotonic drink 100Plus and Magnolia ice cream that enjoy market leadership in the Asia Pacific region.
We included an isotonic drink and non-caloric colored flavored water in a double-blind manner to eliminate placebo effects, and we used a progressive approach in the analysis to make probabilistic inferences about magnitudes of effects (Hopkins et al.