iscador

iscador

Alternative pharmacology
An extract of the European mistletoe, which is believed to stimulate the immune system, increase the white cell count and cause them to engulf and destroy foreign cells, damaged self cells and malignant cells.

Iscador (isˑ·k·dōr),

n a homeopathic preparation of fermented European mistletoe
(Viscum album L.) and highly diluted metals (copper, mercury, or silver). Has been used in Europe as an adjunct to cancer therapy. Similar mistletoe extract preparations include
Eurixor, Helixor, Isorel, Iscucin, Plenosol, and
ABNOBA viscum.
References in periodicals archive ?
Iscador may be considered as an alternative treatment in breast cancer (Ziegler 2008).
On the other hand, the use of Iscador, Helixor, and other mistletoe extracts is virtually unknown in the US.
The fermented mistletoe medicine is called Iscador.
Weleda's first and best-selling such medicine is Iscador [R], the mistletoe extract promoted as a complementary cancer treatment that strengthens the immune system, making it easier for the body to support conventional treatments like chemotherapy and radiation.
Francesca says: "Glasgow Homeopathic Hospital gave me a cactus remedy and trained me to inject myself twice weekly with Iscador.
In a multicenter, parallel-group, cohort study that included 1,442 patients who initially underwent surgery for early-stage breast cancer, 16% of the 710 patients who received subcutaneous injections of the proprietary formulation Iscador experienced adverse events related to their radiation, chemotherapy or hormone treatment, compared with 54% of the 732 treated with conventional modalities alone, Dr.
Actress Suzanne Somers surprised some of her fans when she recently decided to forgo chemotherapy for breast cancer and try an herbal treatment, Iscador.
With the support of her husband, sister (a breast-cancer survivor) and friends - but not her cancer doctors - Somers has followed up surgery and radiation with daily abdominal injections of iscador, an extract of mistletoe, which historically has been looked upon as a charmed substance.
But the mistletoe derivative found in Iscador is very different from mistletoe that can be bought at the local nursery during the Christmas season.
They identified a total of 49 studies on the effects of the mistletoe drug Iscador on survival.
Two articles that are well worth reading for more information on the debate are the editorial by Dent and Clemons (2005 BMJ 331:1202) and particularly Herceptin: more hype than hope (2006 WDDTY 17:5;6-9) which discusses the politics of the use of Herceptin and compares effectiveness with Iscador (an anthroposophical mistletoe compound).
Iscador is fermented mistletoe extract, It is an herbal medication that we have been administering to our patients as part of our integrated therapy approach tot many years.