isobar

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Related to isallobar: Isodrosotherm

isobar

 [i´so-bahr]
1. one of two or more chemical species with the same atomic weight but different atomic numbers.
2. a line on a map or chart depicting the boundaries of an area of constant atmospheric pressure.

i·so·bar

(ī'sō-bar),
1. One of two or more nuclides having the same total number of protons plus neutrons, but with different distribution, for example, argon-40 with 18 protons and 22 neutrons, potassium-40 with 19 protons and 21 neutrons, calcium-40 with 20 protons and 20 neutrons. The product of a β-disintegration is an isobar of its parent.
2. The line on a map connecting points of equal barometric pressure.
3. Any curve or equation relating quantities measured at the same pressure.
[iso- + G. baros, weight]

isobar

/iso·bar/ (i´so-bahr) one of two or more chemical species with the same atomic weight but different atomic numbers.

isobar

[ī′səbär]
Etymology: Gk, isos + barrios, weight
1 a line connecting points of equal pressure on a graph, such as lines connecting points of equal carbon dioxide tension on a pH-bicarbonate diagram.
2 (in nuclear medicine) one of a group of nuclides having the same total number of neutrons and protons in the nucleus but so proportioned that their atomic numbers have different values.

i·so·bar

(ī'sō-bahr)
1. One of two or more nuclides having the same total number of protons plus neutrons, but with different distribution.
2. The line on a map connecting points of equal barometric pressure.
[iso- + G. baros, weight]

iso·bar

(ī'sō-bahr)
One of two or more nuclides having the same total number of protons plus neutrons, but with different distribution.
[iso- + G. baros, weight]

isobar (ī´sōbär),

n in radiochemistry, one of two or more different nuclides having the same mass number.

isobar

1. one of two or more chemical species with the same atomic weight but different atomic numbers.
2. a line on a map or chart depicting the boundaries of an area of constant atmospheric pressure.
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