irruption


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ir·rup·tion

(i-rŭp'shŭn),
Act or process of breaking through to a surface.
[L. irruptio, fr. irrumpo, to break in]

ir·rup·tion

(i-rŭp'shŭn)
Act or process of breaking through to a surface.
[L. irruptio, fr. irrumpo, to break in]
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References in periodicals archive ?
An Irruption of Owls is available in both print and ebook formats.
Because of warming temperatures and consequent irruptions of moose ticks, the New Hampshire moose population, which once numbered 7,500, plummeted 40 percent.
d) the intrusion of groundwater or stroke - by which is meant the sudden irruption or niekontrolowanydoplyw water, brine, lye or water with loose material into the shaft, which are built agregatyglebinowe.
Years with particularly high numbers are often called irruption years and are usually related to a high proportion of hatch year (HY) birds (Iliff 2000, Whalen and Watts 2002, Rasmussen et al.
Not much is known about the owl's winter behavior and ecology, especially during an irruption.
La wilaya dement, categoriquement, les allegations colportees par certains elements, de mauvaise foi, et selon lesquelles les forces de l'ordre auraient fait irruption dans certaines maisons, soulignant que toute violation de la loi par les forces de l'ordre sera severement sanctionnee, a fait savoir la wilaya dans un communique parvenu dimanche a la MAP.
Les forces de l'ordre avaient fait irruption aux premieres heures de la journee de mardi dans un appartement a Medinet Nasr apres avoir recu des informations sur la presence du guide dans cet "appart".
This is a much rarer visitor from Scandinavia, suggesting that an irruption may be underway, when large numbers move in response to a failure in the cone crop.
Seventy years after its irruption in the mid 1940's, the mysteries around the birth of abstraction in Arab art remain a challenge.
It must be truly said that one can not be sure whether or not this is a brief irruption or if this is to be part of a future trend.
But, Foster contends, "It is worth recapturing the expectations of the 1830s and early 1840s as a way of understanding the mentality of the first Romantics--and to suggest that the irruption of the Famine, and the ensuing radicalization of nationalist politics, produced an unexpected effect, creating barriers and divergences which were not, up to that point, inevitable" (90).
The white, 2-foot-tall birds, which live in the Arctic the rest of the year, are known to fly south in large numbers every few winters in what is known as an irruption.