irrupt


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irrupt

(ĭ-rŭpt′)
intr.v. ir·rupted, ir·rupting, ir·rupts
1. To break or burst in: The boys irrupted into the kitchen.
2. Ecology To increase rapidly in number, especially beyond the normal range: snowy owls that irrupted southward.

ir·rup′tion n.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The fact that (1) native phytophagous herbivores periodically irrupt and reduce the abundance and vigor of dominant plant species, (2) that these outbreaks may occur more readily in dense or lush concentrations of their hosts, and (3) that an outbreak may occur more than once during the life span of a long-lived host suggests that outbreaks may be important in community regulation and deserve serious attention from experimentalists and theorists alike.
It is generally accepted that food supply is at least part of the cause of irruptions," says University of Colorado scientist Carl Bock, though, he added, there is "great disagreement," about their frequency and about whether different species irrupt in synchrony.
When vole numbers drop, every three to five years, the great gray and northern hawk owls irrupt, leaving the boreal forests and appearing in greater numbers far to the south.
11) Texts that irrupt into present time disturb the process of narrative containment whereby setting action in the past locates it in a cyclical and closed process.
The analysis illuminates a topic that has been attracting attention in recent contributions to Aboriginal ethnography: how Dreamings irrupt into contemporary histories and act in ways that have political significance, contesting whitefella paradigms and re-asserting the world-view of the original Australians.
However, whereas for Lacan, symbolic structure underpins any act of signification, in which both registers inevitably come into play, Kristeva speaks of the semiotic as that which "precedes" the symbolic and can occasionally irrupt into it (Kristeva Reader 113) and thus as a register that can exist irrespective of it, like the primal Voice in Cixous' theorization)--an idea which is impossible in Lacanian terms, where any imaginary captation is underlain and made possible by the structures of the symbolic that legislate the combinations of signifiers.
The point where they cross represents the "hole" from or through which the Real might irrupt (this "hole" sounds much like the fabulous "wormholes" of science fiction through which subjects enter alternate universes).
For according to Julia Kristeva, the ascension to the Symbolic, hence to all signifying practices, has to go through the initial moment of repression of the semiotic relation to the maternal body, even though the repressed semiotic/maternal is always there ready to be reactivated, to irrupt and disrupt the Symbolic order so as to create a space for the insurgence of the poetic.
Gutai: Splendid Playground" will irrupt such views altogether with a dazzlingly expansive approach that includes not only celebrated feats (such as Kazuo Shiraga's epic struggles with mud and paint) but also little-known works (such as Akira Kanayama's inflatables and the assemblages of Saburo Murakami).
I prefer that something strange irrupt in the writing, something not at all assimilable or solved, something that will construct itself, be looking for itself.
The gothic quality of the cyberspace matrix - haunted as it is by spirits of the dead, littered with electronic trap doors and dark electronic corners, a mysterious nexus where some other world can always irrupt within this one without warning - implies the landscape of the irrational psyche, which in turn implies a metaphor for mind-body dualism.
In this second understanding of the fantastic, the impossible element irrupts in a realistic context, so that it transgresses and questions the laws of literary realism.