irreversible pulpitis


Also found in: Dictionary, Encyclopedia.

pulpitis

 [pul-pi´tis]
inflammation of dental pulp.
irreversible pulpitis severe pulpitis with minimal chance of spontaneous recovery, accompanied by an exudate and often pain.
reversible pulpitis pulpitis in which the pulp may recover spontaneously; it is usually asymptomatic until pain is caused by some external stimulus.

ir·re·vers·i·ble pul·pi·tis

inflammation of the dental pulp from which the pulp is unable to recover; clinically, may be asymptomatic or characterized by pain that persists after thermal stimulation; microscopically, characterized by marked acute or chronic inflammation, sometimes with partial pulpal necrosis.

ir·re·vers·i·ble pul·pi·tis

(ir'rĕ-vĕr'si-bĕl pŭl-pī'tis)
Inflammation of the dental pulp from which the pulp is unable to recover; clinically, may be asymptomatic or characterized by pain that persists after thermal stimulation.

ir·re·vers·i·ble pul·pi·tis

(ir'rĕ-vĕr'si-bĕl pŭl-pī'tis)
Inflammation of dental pulp from which pulp is unable to recover; clinically, may be asymptomatic or characterized by pain that persists after thermal stimulation.
References in periodicals archive ?
Pulp devitalization is usually the first step of treatment of irreversible pulpitis, if the dental pulp cannot be completely removed.
Within the limitations of this study we can conclude that teeth with irreversible pulpitis have no statistically significant difference between articaine buccal infiltration and inferior alveolar nerve block.
Comparative evaluation of local infiltration of articaine, articaine plus ketorolac, and dexamethasone on anesthetic efficacy of inferior alveolar nerve block with lidocaine in patients with irreversible pulpitis.
Results: There was no statistically significant difference between ibuprofen and acetaminophen on success rate of inferior alveolar nerve block in patient with irreversible pulpitis.
Comparison of anesthetic efficacy of 4% lidocaine for maxillary buccal infiltration in patients with irreversible pulpitis.
While analyzing the common indications of root canal treatment, irreversible pulpitis and necrotic pulp are the commonest5.
Based on the following clinical and radiographic examinations, diagnosis of reversible pulpitis, irreversible pulpitis, periapical periodontitis and acute apical abscess can be made clearly.
Srinivasan and Kavitha compared the effect of two local anesthetics (4% articaine and 2% lidocaine) in posterior maxilla in patients with irreversible pulpitis and they concluded that the efficacy of 4% articaine was superior to 2% lidocaine for maxillary buccal infiltration.
The clinical and radiographic findings lead to a provisional diagnosis of chronic irreversible pulpitis of the right maxillary first molar.
If the cavity is not treated by a dentist, irreversible pulpitis may ensue.
Sample size of study subjects was 120 who were diagnosed with irreversible pulpitis of permanent 1st mandibular premolar.
Otherwise, it can rise as much as 35[degrees]c resulting in irreversible pulpitis.