irrationalism


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irrationalism

(ĭ-răsh′ə-nə-lĭz′əm)
n.
1. Irrational thought, expression, or behavior; irrationality.
2. Belief in feeling, instinct, or other nonrational forces rather than reason.
References in periodicals archive ?
7) Even if the response to Ginzburg is not satisfactory, since it was not a reply, it should be remarked that Hayden White has never evaded the debate on the role of irrationalism, relativism and skepticism in history (WHITE 1992, p.
215-216) Furthermore, the supposed irrationalism in Kuhn's view of scientific change is based on taking Kuhn's social history of science as an externalist account of scientific change.
The role of radical social movements has often been down-played as a context in social art history, but this book joins a growing body of scholarship that argues that social movements, and anarchism in particular, were central to the new modes and values of artistic production in European Modernism, whose concern - exemplified in Dada - with negation and antagonism often had a far more solid ground than the mythological straw-man 'anarchism' of some vague chaotic irrationalism previously often ascribed to it.
The irrationalism is, for Popper, a position that does not commit to any argument and even worse to logic.
His analysis provides evidence for the development of dramaturgic devices that present "plausible causality," moving this drama "away from the realm of Romantic irrationalism that has disturbed critics from Kleist's time to the present" (55).
Then, however, the "rough beast" of fascism's populist irrationalism challenged both until defeat in the Second World War.
However, this is not simply a fideistic retreat into irrationalism.
Therefore, these two men sought to immunize human beings through an approach which perceives the past as a historical and social evolution in certain circumstances, while rejecting irrationalism that cannot detect the drastic change affecting these circumstances.
But they do apparently make common cause with a related version of this irrationalism, namely, folk wisdom and populist pursuits or, even, populist vulgarity.
Hiromi Mizuno has done an important service for sociologists of science in Japan, and for political economists and scholars of economic development and political modernity, for whom Japan is the emblem of a nation reborn: after World War Two, the values of modern science and democracy replaced Japan's alleged prewar and premodern irrationalism.
The political ascension of this hawkish racist, ex-nightclub bouncer from Russia and former member of the party Kach who espoused overtly the idea of forced mass expulsion of Palestinian citizens of Israel and has even recently suggested, as final solution, that Gaza be nuked, constitutes an eloquent expression of the moral decay and suicidal irrationalism infecting the Israeli society at large.
Describing what he defines as James's "agenda," Belliotti writes, "He aspires to demonstrate that belief in God is not blind irrationalism, but a voluntary, rationally permissible, genuine choice" (138).