involution


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Related to involution: involution of uterus

involution

 [in″vo-lu´shun]
1. a rolling or turning inward.
2. one of the movements involved in the gastrulation of many animals.
3. a retrograde change of the entire body or in a particular organ, as the retrograde changes in the female genital organs that result in normal size after delivery.
4. the progressive degeneration occurring naturally with advancing age, resulting in shriveling of organs or tissues. adj., adj involu´tional.
Involution of the uterus. Height of the uterine fundus decreases by approximately 1 cm/day. From McKinney et al., 2000.

in·vo·lu·tion

(in'vō-lū'shŭn),
1. Return of an enlarged organ to normal size.
2. Turning inward of the edges of a part.
3. In psychiatry, mental decline associated with advanced age.
Synonym(s): catagenesis
[L. in-volvo, pp. -volutus, to roll up]

involution

/in·vo·lu·tion/ (in″vo-loo´shun)
1. a rolling or turning inward.
2. a retrograde change of the body or of an organ, as the retrograde changes in size of the female genital organs after delivery.
3. the progressive degeneration occurring naturally with age, resulting in shriveling of organs or tissues.involu´tional

involution

(ĭn′və-lo͞o′shən)
n.
1.
a. The act of involving.
b. The state of being involved.
2. Intricacy; complexity.
3. Something, such as a long grammatical construction, that is intricate or complex.
4. Mathematics An operation, such as negation, which, when applied to itself, returns the original number.
5. Embryology The ingrowth and curling inward of a group of cells, as in the formation of a gastrula from a blastula.
6. Medicine
a. A decrease in size of an organ, as of the uterus following childbirth.
b. A progressive decline or degeneration of normal physiological functioning occurring as a result of the aging process.

in′vo·lu′tion·al adj.

involution

[in′vəlo̅o̅′shən]
Etymology: L, involvere, to wrap up
1 a normal process of turning or rolling inward characterized by a decrease in the size of an organ caused by a decrease in the size of its cells, such as postpartum involution of the uterus.
2 (in embryology) a developmental process in which a group of cells grows over the rim at the border of the organ or part and, rolling inward, rejoins the organ or part to form a tube, such as in the heart or bladder.

involution

Gynecology See Uterine involvement Medtalk A ↓in organ size or functional capacity, generally understood to be age-related.

in·vo·lu·tion

(in'vŏ-lū'shŭn)
1. Return of an enlarged organ to normal size.
2. Turning inward of the edges of a part.
3. psychiatry Mental decline associated with advanced age.
Synonym(s): catagenesis.
[L. in-volvo, pp. -volutus, to roll up]

involution

1. Decay, retrogression or shrinkage in size.
2. A return to a former state.
3. An infolding or INVAGINATION.

involution

(of plant organs) having rolled-up margins.

in·vo·lu·tion

(in'vŏ-lū'shŭn)
1. Return of an enlarged organ to normal size.
2. Turning inward of the edges of a part.
[L. in-volvo, pp. -volutus, to roll up]

involution

1. a rolling or turning inward.
2. one of the movements involved in the gastrulation of many animals.
3. a retrograde change of the entire body or in a particular organ, as the retrograde changes in the female genital organs that result in normal size after delivery.
4. the progressive degeneration occurring naturally with advancing age, resulting in shriveling of organs or tissues.

uterine involution
reduction in size of the uterus in the period immediately after parturition.
References in periodicals archive ?
We see, thank to adaptation: evolution, involution, and neutrality (indeterminacy), each one of these three neutrosophic components in some degree.
Insulin-like growth factor 2 and potential regulators of hemangioma growth and involution identified by large-scale expression analysis.
For the reverse inclusion, suppose c([beta]) is a 3412-avoiding involution of length n + 1.
Certainly, delayed uterine involution further predisposes the presentation of metritis.
LPS induces acute involution of the adult and fetal thymus [sup][2],[3],[17],[18] and, as a consequence impairs immune functions.
Let [pi] be the involution of length (2n - 2) obtained from [sigma] by deleting k and 2n, and reducing the result to an involution of length (2n -2).
k](r), let [iota] be an r-admissible involution of [Z.
Veterinary obstetrics includes pre-partum and post-partum conditions, maternal and fetal dystocia, torsion and prolapse of maternal organs, metabolic and involution disorders and other sequel of the exposed birth canal during the recuperative period.
The etiologic hypothesis involves the postpartum period and its dramatic shifts in hormone levels, which are a prerequisite for successful uterine involution and eventual return of menstrual cycle.
But those too ready to judge a book by its title may be in for a surprise, here: for Involution is in actuality a poetic-based exploration of the Western thinking process, and is more focused on the process of Mankind's incremental rediscovery than scientific or spiritual analysis.
The web of sense; patterns of involution in selected works of Virginia Woolf and Vladimir Nabokov.
Uterine involution involves the contraction of the uterus, sloughing of the caruncles and regeneration of the endometrium (Gier and Marion, 1968).