involuntary hospitalization

involuntary hospitalization

Forensic psychiatry A civil commitment in which a person is formally confined to a mental health institution, due to mental illness, incompetence, alcoholism, drug addiction, or other, as he/she is deemed dangerous to him/herself or others. See Commitment.
References in periodicals archive ?
Dangerous mental illness: 96 percent support temporary bans on firearm purchases or possession by persons who have had a short-term involuntary hospitalization with a clinical finding of being a danger to self or others.
After he tried to kill his mother in 1999, a court found him not guilty by reason of insanity and determined he was mentally ill and subject to involuntary hospitalization, Cuyahoga County court records show.
When considering the case from the perspective of beneficence, a counselor may argue that because EDs, particularly AN, are undeniably lethal when untreated, interventions such as involuntary hospitalization may be necessary (Griffiths & Russell, 1998; Werth, Wright, Archambault, & Bardash, 2003).
A rep for the Ventura County Sheriff's office told Fox News that the former Nickelodeon star is being held on a 5150 hold, which is an involuntary hospitalization for mental analysis.
State doctors don't expect her to regain fitness to stand trial, and after her three years of involuntary hospitalization are up, officials are expected to seek her civil commitment.
6) These statutes "widen the net" of the state mental health system by allowing that system to supervise people with a severe mental illness who are not currently subject to involuntary hospitalization.
Ostopovich, with only 15 days of involuntary hospitalization, would not have met the 30 day precondition for a CTO.
The authors explain a plethora of facets of psychiatry such as: treatment, technology, involuntary hospitalization, the business aspects of the profession, and much more.
118) In 1983, the British government expanded the target population for involuntary hospitalization through passage of the Mental Health Act, which included "psychopathic disorder" within the definition of mental disorder.
The petition alleged that the patient's behavior provided a factual basis to believe he was mentally ill and that no suitable alternative to involuntary hospitalization existed.
Local operational norms, level of professional accountability for assessment decisions, organizational culture and support in decisions to care for a patient in the community, perceptions of conditions at the state hospital, and whether or not involuntary hospitalization is considered a "last resort" option all have been shown to influence the compulsory admission threshold.